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Thread: kenmore centrifuge

  1. #1
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    Oct 2012
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    Default kenmore centrifuge

    Model Number: 110.20022013

    i bought this washing machine for work, and i am trying to make a solids centrifuge out of it. i used hole plugs (over 600 of them) to plug off the drain holes. the top 4 rows of holes i left open and put a fine mesh screen over them. the liquids i am spinning are about 25% solids. the rest is water and oil. its more of a cheap experiment to see what works the best. actual centrifuges to do what i need start at around $15k used. what i am trying to find out is how to disable the lid latch (which the lid is removed) and how to disable the timer on the main switch. i would like for this thing to spin at its highest rpm, i am assuming spin cycle. or is there another way to put it on spin cycle, maybe install a toggle switch.

    thanks in advance for the help

  2. #2
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    This is probably not a good choice of washer for your needs. It does not have a traditional mechanical timer, it is controlled by a computer board. The lid latch has two switches in it, a lid switch and a lock switch. The computer monitors operation of the switches and will disable the washer if they aren't working properly or cycled properly. The computer must detect that the switches are being cycled. You can't just short them out permanently. There is a simple way to operate the machine with the lid open but I can't advise you on this forum due to the safety violation. These machines are not designed to spin with water in them. The computer board monitors motor current and may have a problem with trying to spin a tub full of water. You can go into diagnostic mode and operate spin cycle manually but I don't know how long it will perform the spin or how fast. I don't think you would have any control over that. There is a manual inside the cabinet that explains how to get into diagnostics and perform manual operations. It also has a wiring diagram and with that, you could just put the shift actuator into spin mode and wire the machine to apply power directly to the motor but I would think you would need some type of speed control for what you intend to do with it. Be advised, this machine design is fraught with problems, faulty wiring/connections in particular, although you have a 2013 model so hopefully they have improved since the last year.

    Eric
    Last edited by fairbank56; January 10th, 2013 at 08:17 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Murray, Utah, United States
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    Default

    I use to make these for a company that harvested brine shrimp from the Great Salt Lake to sell to fish food companies. I almost wish you would have asked before you started with the hole plugs. That is probably the worst model to try and make a centrifuge. The absolute best machines for this application is the older style Maytag washers. Mainly because they have a small transmission shaft, only about 6". Plus they are built like a tank. I don't really have a second choice but if I had to make one I would go with an older direct drive Whirlpool washer. On the Maytag I would remove the top and all the wiring, the agitator, and the clothes guard from the top of the tubs along with fill spout and water valve. I then ran the power cord to the motor so plugged in, spin. Unplugged, off. When the Brine Shrimp people originally came to me with this problem it was a no brainer on what machine to use but they wanted three and I only had two so I made one out of a Speed Queen. It walked off the dock into the lake. I made one out of a belt drive Whirlpool but the belt would get wet and slip or the pump would constantly plug up. I quit experimenting after that. I strongly suggest you find an old Maytag. Today's machines pump out the water before they start a spin cycle because the motors can't handle the load. With all the holes plugged up the motor will kick off on the overload almost immediately and will burn out the motor post haste. Almost all top load washers use a 1/2HP. Maytag used a 3/4HP and the belts were under the base plate plus the motor is mounted on springs and rollers so it can slip. Even though a direct drive Whirlpool is my second choice, I doubt it will work.
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    OWNER RICK'S APPLIANCE REPAIR
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  4. #4
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    The motor in your machine is only 1/4HP.

    Eric

  5. #5
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    Default

    thanks for the feedback. the machine will start empty and i will pump the slurry at most 2 gpm into it, the slower the better. the water will run out almost immediately and pump back to a holding tank, leaving a cake on the sides where i will use a shop vac with a 90 deg elbow on the end and scrap the sides while vacuuming into a holding drum for later disposal. the door latch i already disabled (broke) and have the 4 or 5 wires hanging out. i should have checked you guys out first, but i have it now and like i said its more of an experiment. in a years time, it'll be junk and i'll fabricate an industrial one. if there is more info you are not comfortable putting on the forum you can email me at brandon@coastaltankcleaning.com.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kenmore he3t
    ... the water will run out almost immediately and pump back to a holding tank
    Quote Originally Posted by kenmore he3t
    i used hole plugs (over 600 of them) to plug off the drain holes. the top 4 rows of holes i left open and put a fine mesh screen over them.
    Do you see any problems with that theory?


    Quote Originally Posted by kenmore he3t
    in a years time, it'll be junk
    OK my friend, no disrespect intended but I see it just the opposite. I think that's what you're starting with and in a years time it might work like a centrifuge. I wish you the best of luck!
    OWNER RICK'S APPLIANCE REPAIR
    APPLIANCE TECHNICIAN FOR 29 YEARS
    REFRIGERATION SPECIALIST
    ONLINE SERV TECH: ApplianceBlog.com
    CERTIFIED TYPE 1; TYPE 2.....REFRIGERATION SERVICE E.S.

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