110.C85862401 Kenmore HE4 error code E1, testing P2-5 P2-6 properly

NaomiL_YEG

Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2019
Messages
6
Location
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Model Number
110.C85862401
Brand
Sears Kenmore
Age
More than 10 years
Hello!

Here is my sob story! After moving our dryer for a renovation, the heating element wouldn't come on during cycles. We went through the manual and after my husband tried to complete all the diagnostic tests in "Test #3 Heater Test" of the original diagnostic guide, I found a loose connection at the red wire coming in from the power cord. After reconnecting that, we had heat again, but we started to get the E1 error code one minute into the cycle.

We have gone back and tested the thermistor (registers the correct 11 000 ohms of resistance), and confirmed that we have a good connection at the thermal cutoff, the high limit thermostat, and the heater, as per Step 4 ( 0 ohms resistance). Thermal fuse is also good.

Trying to read the resistance on the electronic control panel, I'm not sure if we are executing the test properly. I haven't found a video showing our model and this test, so we are out of our depth. Can you help me confirm if we are doing the test with the ohmmeter correctly? If we are already doing it correctly, can you help me analyze the results? Here's the description:

We are touching the test probes to the tiny metal rectangles on the plastic wire harness (not sure of the right term for the white plastic part) connecting the thermostat and moisture sensors, on the R/W and BLK wires. The probes would not reach down the holes. We measure a resistance of around 20, 000 ohms

We also touched the probes to the pins on the board, P2-5 and P2-6. We measure about the same resistance there.

I've attached images to show you our test and the guide.

Unfortunately, we don't see any corresponding numbers on the guide, so I'm hoping the community can shed some light on this for me! I have no idea if we are on the right track.

I very much appreciate the help! Any general guidance on the E1 error, given the happy thermistor, is also greatly appreciated.
 

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Dan O.

Appliance Tech
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NaomiL_YEG said:
we started to get the E1 error code one minute into the cycle.
Is E1 on constantly or does it flash? That appears to mean 2 different things.


.
 

NaomiL_YEG

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Messages
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Location
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Thanks for the tip of flipping the sheet... I missed that!

So, we got home to put the machine back together and it was actually a flashing E1. With the thermistor in place, we read a resistance of ~17500 ohms between P2-5 and P2-6 (I found a video to confirm that we were testing g resistance in the harness correctly by testing at the little metal rectangles). We pulled the thermistor and it also reads ~17500 ohms. So I think we found the problem... the wiring diagram indicates it should be 10,000 ohms +-3%.

Will replace today and tell you if it is working! Thanks!
 

NaomiL_YEG

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Jun 24, 2019
Messages
6
Location
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Unfortunately the trouble continues. I bought a new thermistor this afternoon, and we checked the room temperature resistance of the new component. It read at 11,000 ohms, which is higher than the guide, but consistent with installation videos I watched, so that seemed normal. We installed it, and tried to run a Timer cycle. It sadly gave us the flashing E1 warning again at 1 minute. Here's where it's a mystery for me. I checked resistance at the control board wires after, and it was back up to 17,500 ohms. I took out the new part, and it also measures at 17,500 ohms. It was definitely the new part because we marked the old one with a marker (I trust me even less than you probably do).

Does anyone understand what happened? I appreciate your time!
 

NaomiL_YEG

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Jun 24, 2019
Messages
6
Location
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
After my last post, I also checked for continuity on the red/wh. and black wires to the thermistor, and they have perfect continuity, so I don't imagine it's the wire harness. Which makes me think that something shorted in the circuit board when we ran the first test cycle after we plugged the loose red wire back in (red to red, after the power cord). Could something have happened there? We had cleaned out a bunch of lint at the same time if that could have an impact... could the thermistor circuit be affected by a change? Like lint dust burning off the heater? Some other typer of surge?

Also, the parts store employee didn't think there was any issue with polarity with the thermistor, but is that the case? Could running current through it the wrong way damage it?

I want to see if I can fix this to make sure we aren't sending a dryer to the landfill over one broken diode on a circuit board. If you have any tips, I'd be grateful! Buying a circuit board just doesn't make sense, and the wire harness seems to be discontinued and hard to find these days anyways.
 

Dan O.

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NaomiL_YEG said:
we ran the first test cycle after we plugged the loose red wire back in (red to red, after the power cord). Could something have happened there?
I don't see how it would.

NaomiL_YEG said:
could the thermistor circuit be affected by a change? Like lint dust burning off the heater? Some other typer of surge?
I doubt that also.

NaomiL_YEG said:
the parts store employee didn't think there was any issue with polarity with the thermistor,
That's correct.

Here's where it's a mystery for me. I checked resistance at the control board wires after, and it was back up to 17,500 ohms.
It's resistance changes with the temperature its sensing at the time it is tested.

we aren't sending a dryer to the landfill over one broken diode on a circuit board.
If any component of the board failed, the whole board would have to be replaced.

I'm afraid I don't have any other ideas. Maybe you can consider having a trained technician look into it for you. A Inglis/Whirlpool factory authorized technician would be a good choice since Whirlpool made your model for Sears and one of their techs would be most familiar with the product design and trouble spots.

Dan O.
 
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NaomiL_YEG

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Jun 24, 2019
Messages
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Location
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
I didn't know that about the circuit board. I watched some tutorials about resodering damaged points and so I thought it could be fixed, even if I realized it wasn't a job for me! Thanks for your time reading through Dan. While we've had success replacing a few components on the fridge, dishwasher and furnace before, we had no luck figuring it out this time. It seems to be the control board based on everything that seemed to test clean, so I'm going to give it up as a bad job. The $300 circuit board isn't worth replacing on a 13 year old dryer... we'll only spend $600 on a good, brand new machine from our scratch and dent dealer. I'll search the forum for threads on this Electrolux! Thanks again for your help.
 

Dan O.

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Messages
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Location
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NaomiL_YEG said:
I didn't know that about the circuit board. I watched some tutorials about resodering damaged points and so I thought it could be fixed

If a circuit board fails the appliance manufacturer supplies a replacement board. Period.

PCBs are not usually repaired although if you can find an electronics specialtist and they can identify the specifications of the components involved (the appliance manufactures don't give out that information) and determine which components have failed, it is certainly physically possible to repair it and there are companies out there that can but it is not usually something an appliance technician is capable of going either.

Dan O.
 
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