1940’s GE Refrigerator Relay

rickgburton

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That sounds correct. Swap the wires from the old control to the new control.
 

Comar

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I was already connected to the new control when I was getting the open and closed readings.
 

Comar

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The light comes on but the compressor does not. I went ahead and did the compressor test again just to be sure it still worked and it did.
 

rickgburton

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Go back and reread post #23. Why are you measuring between the black and the green wire?? I said:
rickgburton said:
If your meter shows 1 or open, turn the thermostat on the middle (or highest) setting. Connect your meter to the white wire and the green wire. Your meter should show 0 or closed. Turn the thermostat to the off position and your meter should show 1 or open.
 

Comar

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Yes, I realize that. That’s why I specified on post 57 about whether or not the colors mattered. When I checked between white and green I got nothing whether the thermostat was on or off.
 

rickgburton

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The only wires coming into the old thermostat were the black and white wires.
Was it a single white wire and a single black wire? If it was, that means the green wire is being used as either the Neutral wire or L1.
 

Comar

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It was just like the black/white/green wire. But there’s only a black and a white in this one.
 

Comar

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The wire that comes down from the cabinet is a 3 conductor wire. (Black/White/Green). The wire that comes out of the back of the refrigerator to the thermostat is a 2 conductor wire. (Black/White)
 

rickgburton

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You'll need to use your meter to identify the wires from the light, light switch. and the thermostat then mark the wires accordingly.
 

Comar

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Hey Rick, sorry I’ve been awol. I was on the dreaded COVID quarantine while I was working with you on this. But I’m back to work now. I’ll get back to the refrigerator as soon as I can and try to verify the wiring.
 

Comar

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I was able to verify the wiring from the cabinet today.
Black from cabinet shows closed at the black at the cold control and the light socket. If I push the door switch it shows open at the light socket.
White from the cabinet shows open everywhere.
Green from the cabinet shows closed at the white at the cold control.
 

Comar

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I know this ain’t much! If you can’t see it I’ll try to do something else.
 

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rickgburton

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That brings us back to my original wire diagram:
R-Hotwire-Solid State-no fan-3.jpg

This is what I mean when I say you need to identify the wires:
The only component in the refrigerator that requires 120 VAC is the light bulb. In this diagram, L1 goes through the light switch so when the switch is pressed in it opens L1 and the light turns off. The cold control works just like the light switch. When it's off it breaks the circuit to the relay. Most of the time it breaks the N side of the circuit. As you can see the double white wire on the cold control supplies a constant N to the light. The only thing that needs a N (in the box) is the light. So basically, in the box, you have a load (light) and two on/off switches (light switch and cold control)

Disconnect the two wires on the cold control, take it out of the circuit. Now, you know the light needs 120 VAC (L1 and N). You also know the light switch is going to break L1 or N. So, if you connect one meter lead to a light bulb wire and the other lead to the L1 or N wire in the cabinet (black or white), you should be able to tell which wire it breaks. In my diagram above it breaks the L1 wire. That didn't work for you, so now, let's assume the light switch does break the L1 wire but it has a double wire on one of the switch terminals that supplies L1 to the cold control and breaks the L1 circuit/wire in the cold control to the relay. It would probably look like this:
R-Hotwire-Solid State-no fan-4.jpg


So, now you have 120 VAC going to the cold control and to the light bulb (through the switch). Remember, the cold control is an on/off switch. Now the solid state relay is the load and the cold control is going to break the L1 wire or the N wire. You already know the relay needs 120 VAC and if the cold control breaks L1, N must be constant from the power cord. If it breaks N, L1 must be constant from the power cord.
R-Hotwire-Solid State-no fan-8.jpg

OR
R-Hotwire-Solid State-no fan-7.jpg

OK my friend, I hope you can figure it out from here. This thread has taken up a lot of my time and is over a month old with 78 posts. I don't mind helping you fix your machine but I don't have the time to teach you basic electronics and walk you through it. Just this post (#78) alone, with the diagrams has taken me two hours.
 
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