1950’s Vintage GE Oven - broiler element number for replacement

Coachcoup

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Location
Gibsonia, PA USA
Model Number: J501N3GH 3 8

I have a 1950’s model oven I just adore. I’m looking to get a broiler replacement element. I ordered the burner element back in ‘02 and used model number WB44X5099.(came from Sears parts and repair services) I have not had any help from GE finding the broiler replacement.... I’ve attached a photo of the tag with the model number. Can’t find any serial number... and I’ve attached a photo of the front too. Also in the 20+ years I’ve been the owner it has never had a light bulb. If you could provide some guidance on it I’d be eternally grateful too! Thanks so much!
 

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Dan O.

Appliance Tech
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I ordered the burner element back in ‘02 and used model number WB44X5099.

That is the part number of a bake element.

The current broil element looks to be part # WB45X56 but most of my usual suppliers as well as GE them self show out of stock...and expensive! There's a chance it may be discontinued. I did find a couple of replacements that are currently available at the following link. Their part numbers may be slightly different but any of them should work fine.

LINK > GE Broil Element WB45X56/RP45X56


Dan O.
 

Dan O.

Appliance Tech
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Messages
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Ontario, Canada
Coachcoup said:
Any luck on light replacement ideas?

I'm afraid i have no idea what kind of bulb it takes. The parts list says "purchase locally". It gives a # N127P1506E but I can't trace it.

It does say it is a 25 watt bulb. There's only 2 kinds of bulb bases I know of used in North American appliances, a standard Edison base (regular light bulb base) or a candelabra base (like a large Christmas tree bulb base). A regular appliance bulb is a 40 watt Edison base.

Try visiting (or calling) a local specialty lighting store (not a 'big box' retailer) and describe what I said.

JFYI

Dan O.
 
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