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Thread: appliance-repair.org program

  1. #1
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    Default appliance-repair.org program

    Hi yall. I'm thinking about buying a program on the site appliance-repair.org. The guy selling it calls himself Uncle Harry, and he has 35 years experience in the business. His program is very comprehensive with manuals for just about all appliances, thousands of pictures online, a detailed business program etc. I have never fixed an appliance in my life, but I would like to get into this business. The cost is $1300. I'd appreciate any advice. Some of the things I'm concerned about are; are most transactions with customers good?...Can someone buy some old appliances, check them out, and after reading his books and other material jump into this business?

  2. #2
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    McMullen Valley, Arizona
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    Default

    I would be very cautious about this kind of a program.

    The best way to get into the appliance repair business is to work for an appliance repair company for awhile, so you can get the "HANDS ON" training thats so important.

    Also check with your local community college, lots of them offer an appliance repair course at very low cost, most below $100.00 per course.

    Thats how I started in 1987.

    Jake
    Appliance Repair School 1987-1988
    Star Appliance Tech. 2 yrs. 1988-1990
    Wards Appliance Tech. 11 yrs. 1990-2001
    Sears Appliance Tech. 4 yrs. 2001-Oct. 2005
    Jake's Appliance Repair Nov. 2005-present

    Look-Up & Order Parts

  3. #3
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    Default learning appliance repair

    I was going to buy an appliance repair business, but it was sold before I got my cash in it. I did have a chance to work with the owner for about a week. I myself am Mechancically inclined, mainly because I have studied mechanics and electrical princibles on my own. But, while I did have a chance to see this guy working on appliances, I did learn a few things. First, if you have any technical knowledge at all in electronics or mechanics or both you will have no problem in learning appliance repair. I think a course in repairing appliances would be a good start. But the cost will be at least 700 bucks for the whole course. I would check and make sure it is an easy to understand course. There are some ways to learn on the Internet. Like the Samurai repair forum. I haven't tried this guy's online information. You can become a member of his group for 49 bucks a year, which is better than paying 700 bucks for a course, but I don't know how the quality and ease of learning is with this guy. I have E Mailed him a few times to find out about his online Appliance learning experience, but he hasn't replied. I have found out that these appliance repair techs who have there own businesses won't tell you much, because they are afraid of the competition. So you won't get much from them. That is why I think a home study course or a college course would be a good idea. But again you will pay more for it. But as I said, learning how to repair appliances in my opinion is not that hard. There is a learning process, like any other new endeavor, but it can be learned from anyone who is willing to apply thereself. You can learn it. I would shop around and ask the school or person about there courses before paying money. If 700 bucks will pay for a good learning experience then it is worth it. One thing I will say if your planning on starting an appliance repair business, is do some market research before spending any money on learning the technical part of it. There may be to much competition already in your area. So, do a business plan first. Then decide if spending money for a course will be worth it. Otherwise your just learning how to fix your own washing machine at a considerable price.

  4. #4
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    I am curious to know IF anyone has tried this system and how it has worked out for them?

  5. #5
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    Default Uncle Harry and learning appliance repair

    Your not alone in your search for a trustworthy appliance repair mentor. I am mechanically inclined myself. But as with any new endeavor, even for the mechanically inclined, there is still a learning curve. Troubleshooting is one thing, but becoming famillar with new gadgets can be overwhelming. I won't reccomend any person or trainer, because I to am searching for some good reference material, but I have heard some good things about Harry Raker. So, it might be worthwhile to check. I do know that a lot of the repairs done on appliances are simple repairs. Not all, but I would say 90% are mostly belt replacement, bushings, seals, lose connections (electrical contacts), bad heating elements, defrosting problems (refrigerators) and ignition starters (Gas stoves and ovens.) I had a chance to work with an appliance repair business for a week, and I was going to buy it, but I missed out on the purchase. So I am searching for a good program myself. It will be a toss up between Harry Raker and Jim Johnson. Jim Johnson is a technical writer, has a lot of books out on the subject and teaches and writes for corrospondent courses. Raker has a more down to earth approach for the beginner, while Jim Johnson material is focussed on the technical part of it. I would shop around, but you might want to look into these two guys for teaching material. I know, I'll probably get some bad replys on this one, so if anyone else can reccomend something else, by all means. But, I shouldn't say reccomend. I will mention one thing about Harry Raker, be carefull when talking to his so called students, I don't know about all of them. but I know for sure that some of them are paid to endorse his course. So, you got to look at it very carefully. So, I am not reccomending, only advising.

  6. #6
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    In the past I have tried a couple of Harry Rakers pdf manuals that I purchased online. There were fun to read but they seemed very outdated although the one I bought was not one of the detailed manuals that he sells. I also have purchased several books on appliance repair such as one by Jim Johnson but the date on this book was 1993. It was interesting reading it as I love reading any repair manual or forums such as these however,I feel a lot has changed in the past 13 years of appliance repair and this book is also outdated.

  7. #7
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    Default Books and Education

    If your mechanicaly inclined, I don't think you will have a problem in repairing new appliances. They are basically the same as the older ones with a couple of exceptions. Direct drive motors, control boards instead of electrical timer motors and knowing the error codes. I know this because I to am doing some studying on Appliances and repairing them.

    You can get different model numbers from Appliance repair forums like this one, just type the model number in, and you'll get the tech sheets, and it will show you exactly how to repair them, from the esterline charts to how to take them apart to how to repair and troubleshoot them. Couldn't be easier. Hope this helps!

  8. #8
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    I am mechanicaly inclined as I have worked on a few appliances and on automobiles. Right now I am working on a dehumidifier with digital display and think I am at a deadend, which is nothing new. I also visit appliance forums such as these and other repair websites. Applianceaid.com is one of the best resources for appliance repair in my estimation. It has user friendly pages and a lot of information that continually gets updated. Thank you for your imput.

  9. #9
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    Default Troubleshooting

    Yea I know what you mean. I myself have to become familiar with any gizmo before I can figure it out. I have worked with an appliance expert for a while, and most of the repairs were simple. Not hard to figure out. But, I didn't go the whole route with him, so I am sure I missed a bunch I could have learned. I have repaired some equipment where I work, and it isn't appliance related, but the equipment does have control boards, motors and silinoids. Took me a while to figure it out, but after some troubleshooting I finally got it down. I think just getting in there and doing it is the best thing, after some learning curves are overcome of course. I think you'll figure out the Dehumidifier. After all what more can it be than a few electrical and mechanical princibles.

  10. #10
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    I wholeheartedly agree with you about "hands on training" being the best way to learn things. You can read a lot of information but until you actually start taking things apart I think you're missing something. Between your job and working along side a tech, it sounds like you got yourself a nice headstart in the craft. I have allways enjoyed fixing things for my friends and family especially if things work out. It just makes me feel good inside when you accomplish something for their benefit. Most of the repairs I have performed so far have been fairly easy as far as troubleshooting goes such as belt replacement, thawing out a frozen defrost drain, replacing a faulty ignitor. I'm not sure if this is the norm as far as a appliance repair techs day goes, but I remember you saying there were a lot of "common" repairs when you went out on calls. One other thing I failed to mention though in my case especially if it's automobile work, it probably takes me 2 to 3 hours longer to complete the job than it would take a tech doing the same repair. It drives my wife batty sometimes! Me too!

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