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Thread: 1950 Crosley Shelvador power cord and relay replacements?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
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    Huntington Beach, CA
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    Cool 1950 Crosley Shelvador power cord and relay replacements?

    Hello Experts,

    I'm in sort of the same boat as "Scarygary" in that I also own a 1950 Crosley Shelvador, model #1017, with a 1/8 hp, 2.5 amp compressor. I have also read all of the posts related to hot wire relays. However, that's the end of our similarities because after reading Scarygary's post it's obvious he has some understanding of the wiring necessary to change out his relay where I have absolutely no clue or experience dealing with any electrical issues; except that flipping a light switch will usually turn the light on or off 😊. As I anxiously await an answer to Scarygary's hot relay question, which I also need to replace in my fridge, I figured I would pose some of my own fridge problems and questions:

    I bought my fridge 3 years ago from the original owner and up until 3 weeks ago I had her plugged in and keeping our beer cold in the garage. I unplugged her when two of my adult children received a bit of a shock on the same day, after opening her up to grab a cold one. They received an electric shock, not the shock of running out of beer 🍻. Anyway, I already knew the fridge wasn't grounded and I started reading months and months ago trying to figure out how to change the power cord to one with a grounded plug. I haven't really found a definitive answer, but I have learned a lot and I have subscribed to a bunch of threads for future reference in my restoration of this little beauty. The most important thing I have learned from all of your posts is to take photos before you remove or accidentally break anything!

    Here's what the 3 wires look like coming off the compressor: note the one on the right appears to be green and the wire is exposed through the jacket.

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    Here's what the 3-wire compressor cord and 2-wire power cord look like going into the old Delco relay and what the 3 wires (red, black, and white [yellowed]) look like as they drop out of the fridge and connect to the relay: note the black wire is exposed through the jacket (blurry, but it looks gray/silver between the white and red wires) at the top of the relay before it and the red and white wires take off and up into the fridge. I'm wondering if this exposure is recent and explains the recent shocking experiences.

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    My awesome fridge was working fine until I recently unplugged it due to the shocks. As I've now discovered cracked and exposed wires in more than one spot, in addition to her already not being grounded, I do not want to plug it in and (make my son) do ohm tests because of the risk of more shocks. Can you just help me select the proper relay, power cord, and a wiring diagram so that we (my son) can re-wire everything and then check to see what is and is not working?

    Thanks a million for any help,

    Annie O

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Murray, Utah 84107, United States
    Posts
    30,869

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    Quote Originally Posted by AnnieOakley67
    ... we (my son) can re-wire everything...
    Hi, trust me when I say this is a can of worms best left closed. It's an old machine and the wires are brittle. The less you need to move them around the better. On the old two wire machines all you need to do is turn the plug around in the outlet. It's the way the houses were wired back then. All the Neutral wires are connected to earth ground.

    Quote Originally Posted by AnnieOakley67
    I do not want to plug it in and (make my son) do ohm tests because of the risk of more shocks.
    Never ever have a machine plugged in when measuring resistance. If you want to check for a short, unplug the machine. Set your meter to the lowest ohms scale. Touch one meter lead to one of the plug terminals and touch the other meter lead to the cabinet or frame. Your meter will indicate 0 if there is a short to the cabinet.

    To find a short you need to interrupt the path the electricity takes to isolate it. A short can be just about anywhere. The good news is there's not a lot of electrical parts in that machine. There's a door switch, light bulb receptacle, cold control (thermostat) and the wires in between. Remove just the three wires going into the machine from the relay and leave everything else connected. If your meter still indicates a short, the problem is in the compressor, relay, power cord, or wires in between. If your meter indicates 1 (or open), the short is in the light switch, light bulb receptacle, cold control, or wires in between. In order for me to tell you how to check it, you need to tell me what the letters are next to the wire terminals on the relay.
    OWNER RICK'S APPLIANCE REPAIR
    APPLIANCE TECHNICIAN FOR 31 YEARS
    REFRIGERATION SPECIALIST
    ONLINE SERV TECH: ApplianceBlog.com
    CERTIFIED TYPE 1; TYPE 2.....REFRIGERATION SERVICE E.S.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Huntington Beach, CA
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    Rick,

    Thank you for the help so far. I'm sure you've already saved me from electrocuting myself or burning my house down, probably both! After removing the red, black, and white (yellowed) wires that go up into the fridge from the relay, I was able to see the relay labels you asked for. I marked them up on this photo I took when all of the wires were still attached.

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    Annie O

  4. #4
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    Jul 2006
    Location
    Murray, Utah 84107, United States
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    Once you have the three wires disconnected and isolated (machine unplugged) turn the cold control to the "OFF" position (or disconnect the two wires on the cold control) .Measure the resistance from the red wire to cabinet ground. You're actually checking continuity looking for a short. On the DMM, "1" is open, no continuity or no short. "0" is closed, continuity or short. Red wire to ground your meter should show 1, no short. No short, check the black and white wire the same way.
    OWNER RICK'S APPLIANCE REPAIR
    APPLIANCE TECHNICIAN FOR 31 YEARS
    REFRIGERATION SPECIALIST
    ONLINE SERV TECH: ApplianceBlog.com
    CERTIFIED TYPE 1; TYPE 2.....REFRIGERATION SERVICE E.S.

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