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Thread: New Element in a 1957 Hotpoint wall oven

  1. #21
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    Thanks! That's the first time in a long time I've encountered someone else who knows what microfiche are. I'll be sure to report back when I've conducted my hunt.

  2. #22
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    Hi again,
    I managed to find a replacement thermostat. I realize it's either that or the 4 position bake switch, but I'm starting with the one I could find the replacement for. This leads me to two questions:
    First, does anyone know the replacement part number for the 4 position, 3 heat time bake switch #601837? (Also, is there a more appropriate name for it? I'm pulling this off the schematic).

    Second, the new thermostat has spade terminals instead of screws, but multiple wires were screwed in at each screw. Is there any harm or disadvantage to double crimping the wires into one female connector?
    Better safe than sorry!

    Thanks again!

  3. #23
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    Lightbulb

    does anyone know the replacement part number for the 4 position, 3 heat time bake switch #601837?
    Hotpoint part number 601837 subbed to GE # WB22X5049 and then to WB22X5131. Although all are discontinued, there are currently a couple available at this link

    LINK > 601837/WB22X5049/WB22X5131 Selector Switch

    From the pictures of that replacement switch, it looks like it no longer has a terminal market "TN" (the abbreviation might be for 'Timer Neutral'). The rest of the terminal markings look the same. I don't know what would be needed to adapt the replacement switch.


    is there a more appropriate name for it?
    Generally it is just referred to as an "oven selector switch" or "bake/broil selector switch".


    Is there any harm or disadvantage to double crimping the wires into one female connector?
    As long as the connector is an appropriate size to accommodate multiple wires, it shouldn't be a problem unless one of those wires ever needs to be disconnected or changed in which case the connector might need to be cut off again.

    Dan O.
    Last edited by Dan O.; March 12th, 2019 at 01:52 AM.

  4. #24
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    Thanks as always, Dan. Your help is keeping me on track with this. Is there any way to test a thermostat when it's been pulled to see if it's the culprit? Or is it just better to switch it out, give it all a try and then, if need be, switch out the selector switch?
    I'm a little nervous about shoving that catheter through the hole into the oven. It was tough to pull the old one out and I don't want to break this thing. Is it just a patience game?

  5. #25
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    Lightbulb Continuity test contacts

    Is there any way to test a thermostat when it's been pulled to see if it's the culprit?
    It could have been tested in place. It looks like the two contacts on each side of the thermostat should close between each other when turned on. I assume they should both be open when OFF. If either set show continuity between them when OFF, the control is likely defective.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    By looking at the wiring diagram I can't just the selector switch causing the indicator to be on all the time.

    JMO

    Dan O.

  6. #26
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    Sorry for being dumb, but when you say the control, do you mean the thermostat or the switch?
    I've been wondering if it has to be the switch that's fried simply because the oven is on even when it's off, so since it has the "Off" setting and that's not working, that's where the problem is.
    But you definitely have a more informed opinion than me - I'm just muddling my way through and slowly catching on.

  7. #27
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    Red face

    when you say the control, do you mean the thermostat or the switch?
    The thermostat is often referred to as an "oven control" and as near as I can tell it (the thermostat/oven control) would have to be malfunctioning for the oven light to be staying on.

    I've been wondering if it has to be the switch that's fried simply because the oven is on even when it's off
    You said previously the LIGHT was ON, not the "oven".

    I can't tell fom the wiring diagram if the selector switch would stop the indicator light or not. As near as I can tell a defective thermostat contact would have to be closed for the light to be ON. I would assume those contacts should be open when set to OFF.

    It's also possible both thermostat and selector switch were damaged by the short at the same time.

    Dan O.

  8. #28
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    Thanks for the clarification. I will keep you posted on the status. I'm close.
    I did, however, just find an old wiring puzzle. In the wiring diagram, one wire from the Rota Grill switch is shown going to terminal C on the selector switch. In reality, that wire is connected to the top right screw of the thermostat (see the picture below). Since I have it all pulled apart, do you think I should wire it according to the diagram or the way it has been wired (and working) for who-knows-how-long?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Just found a slightly better angle on a picture I took.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #29
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    Arrow

    Rota Grill switch is shown going to terminal C on the selector switch. In reality, that wire is connected to the top right screw of the thermostat
    Since according to the wiring diagram a wire goes from terminal C to the same terminal on the thermostat, either terminal is essentially the same thing. If it will prevent a dual wire in a single push-on terminal, it could be moved back to the selector switch terminal if it's not too much trouble. Otherwise it shouldn't hurt anything staying where it is.

    Dan O.

  10. #30
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    Success!!! It took a bit to figure out whether everythign was going according to plan or not, but it seems like it's done. The new thermostat has an "off" setting, which the old one did not. It used to be that the selector switch alone turned the oven off. Once I figured that part out, I realized the new thermostat was doing everything it should.

    Now to calibrate it, but to do that, I have to find a way to lock in the semi-circular stem into the circular hole of the knob. I haven't started googling that yet, as I wanted to let you. Thanks again, Dan. This is amazing.

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