• Please note, some of the links on our site are affiliate links (Learn More)

FIXED 790.73433311 Oven Igniter Not Glowing

theyegis

Premium Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2020
Messages
6
Location
New Jersey
Model Number
790.73433311
Brand
Sears Kenmore
Age
6-10 years
Hi,

First time poster and appliance repairer here. I have a Kenmore gas oven that has stopped heating. Upon inspection, the issue appears to be that the oven is not igniting because the igniter is not glowing. Here is what I have figured so far:
  1. The stove top works, so I believe there is incoming gas.
  2. I tested resistance successfully in the igniter, but just in case, I bought and installed a brand new igniter anyway - it did not light up either despite also showing resistance.
  3. The safety valve seems to show the appropriately small amount of resistance, so I believe this is not the issue.
  4. I'm not seeing any error codes or anything suspicious on the display.
Based on my reading, the next logical step appears to be testing the oven control board. However, I'm having a little trouble finding the easiest way to do that. Ideally, I'd like to do it without needing to pull the oven out from the wall, but I'm not sure this is possible (for example, can I test whether the oven control board is sending power via the white igniter connector inside the oven?). If this isn't possible, what would be the next simplest way to determine if the oven control board is the issue? This is my first experience with any sorts of electronics testing, and so far, resistance/continuity testing is all I've done.

I've been unable to find a wiring diagram for this exact model, but know that this is the replacement part I would need according to Sears' website. I also found a wiring diagram for a different model on a different post here that looks like it may be quite similar to mine (the document says ES 100/105 EOC and so does the back of the replacement control in the link I sent above) - it's attached.

Thanks in advance
 

Attachments

Last edited:

jeff1

Appliance Tech - Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 10, 2004
Messages
24,533
Location
Ontario, Canada
Hi,

Clock for your model.
Overlay for the clock for your model.

Power tested into the clock but none tested out with the clock set for bake = bad clock/control = pull out the range to test.
On your sample diagram, it is yellow to white ( N ) for power ( 110-120 volts AC ) for the bake ignitor.

jeff.
 

theyegis

Premium Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2020
Messages
6
Location
New Jersey
Thanks for your quick reply, Jeff. Since I'm new to this, I just wanted to confirm the breakdown of the steps a bit more:

1. Remove the back top plate of the oven to expose the clock/control.
2. Unplug the wire to the clock/control to get access to the pins.
3. Set my multimeter to VAC and place one lead on pin 6 and pin 4.
4. The multimeter should register a reading of the between 110 to 120 VAC. If not, I should replace the clock/control.

Does that sound about right? Thanks for dumbing it down a bit more for a newbie.
 

jeff1

Appliance Tech - Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 10, 2004
Messages
24,533
Location
Ontario, Canada
1. Remove the back top plate of the oven to expose the clock/control.
Remove power, then yes.

2. Unplug the wire to the clock/control to get access to the pins.
I would leave it plugged in and try meter leads where the wire come out of the plactic plug.

3. Set my multimeter to VAC and place one lead on pin 6 and pin 4.
Min 120 volts AC, yes check those wires. Also I would leave one lead on 6 and check neutral closer to the ignitor and also check for 110-120 volts AC.

4. The multimeter should register a reading of the between 110 to 120 VAC. If not, I should replace the clock/control.
For the most part, yes.

jeff.
 

theyegis

Premium Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2020
Messages
6
Location
New Jersey
Thanks, Jeff. All that makes sense. Two things:
  1. Forgive me if this is a stupid question, but you mentioned at the beginning to remove power - do you mean remove it just while I'm in the process of removing the back of the oven? I do need power to check the voltage after, right?
  2. So I will "backstab" the plugged in plastic plug going into the control to check the wires connecting to pins 6 and 4 - that's clear. I'm a little confused about your next statement though: "Also I would leave one lead on 6 and check neutral closer to the ignitor". Where would that neutral spot closer to the ignitor be?
 

theyegis

Premium Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2020
Messages
6
Location
New Jersey
Also, as an addendum to my question #1 above, if the power does indeed need to be on, does the oven also need to be set to bake in order to do this test? Thanks again.
 

theyegis

Premium Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2020
Messages
6
Location
New Jersey
I tested wires 4 and 5 coming into the board and registered about 120 volts.

I tested wires 4 and 6 coming out of the board and registered only about 4.6 volts. When turning on bake, I hear a click and then a quiet high frequency ringing, and the multimeter jumps about .1 volts.

I assume this means the board is most likely bad?
 
Last edited:

jeff1

Appliance Tech - Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 10, 2004
Messages
24,533
Location
Ontario, Canada
do you mean remove it just while I'm in the process of removing the back of the oven?
Yes.

does the oven also need to be set to bake in order to do this test?
Yes.

I assume this means the board is most likely bad?
Yes.

Where would that neutral spot closer to the ignitor be?
Check your sample diagram, see the large N that goes down to one side of the ignitor/gas valve.

jeff.
 

theyegis

Premium Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2020
Messages
6
Location
New Jersey
Wanted to close the loop on this. I replaced the electronic control board and the issue was resolved. Thanks for all the help.
 
Top