Amana range, approximately 8-10? yrs old

deckeda

Premium Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2006
Messages
37
Location
The ATL
I figured I'd add an anti-Amana sentiment here, since this seems the place. Although of course, these days it's not really fair to single out a certain brand since so many share similar parts. I'm referring to this: http://www.applianceblog.com/mainforums/showthread.php?t=5644

What makes posts like the one you're reading now even less helpful is that all brands pretty much have issues at one point or another, do they not? So how does anyone pick a "reliable" appliance? I'm guessing that within each brand there are models that are "reliable" and some that are clunkers. And then for the next model change all bets are off.

So my folks are now thinking of re-doing their counter top to accommodate either a standard-size range (none are as deep as their Amana, so a huge gap would be left behind anything else) or drop-in electric stove with a wall-mount oven below it --- none of which will be Amana.

What's interesting is they can't find on display something akin to what they have:

1) 30" wide electric range w/ ceramic or similar smooth cooktop
2) Convection oven
3) Controls NOT on the back, top of the unit. It's completely flat from the front all the way back; no backsplash or whatever. I suppose this last one might explain why "everything" they've found isn't as deep as their current one?
 

deckeda

Premium Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2006
Messages
37
Location
The ATL
What I've been thinking about, my biggest beef, is that their range has been taken out by some very simple, yet proprietary, electronics. Something is wrong with that.

We're used to mechanical things wearing out or breaking, either due to poor design or years of use. It's an easy concept to grasp; it's what we're used to with cars, VCRs and well, old appliances.

Not a heating element, not a sensor, not a seal, not even so much as a knob. But a friggin' computerized clock timer. $20 worth of 1970's technology with a $200 price tag.

Who's idea was it to combine sensitive electronics with hundreds of degrees of heat? When was THAT ever a smart idea?

Consumers, have we really been impressed with pushing computer-like buttons to make the oven work? (Don't answer that --- I fully admit I love fondling the new washers and dryers soft touch buttons and knobs in the store!)

I understand giving customers "what they want", however when all of the middle and upper-range models are all computerized, that assumes too much of what I'd want.

Without even researching, I'm gonna take a wild stab at it and guess that basic mechanical controls today come on two types of appliances: the bottom-of-the-barrel $200 cheapies, or the upper-echelon price-no-object kind. The vast middle ground, from $500 to $2000 or so gets a computerized control and display because it's "high tech". Am I right?
 

Jake

Appliance Tech - Admin
Staff member
Joined
Aug 24, 2004
Messages
104,526
Location
McMullen Valley, Arizona
What I usually tell my customers is the non-electronic appliances, with the knobs and such are still very reliable.

I tell them if they purchase an electronic/computer controlled appliance, is to always buy the extended warranty that you have the option to buy at the time of purchase for at least 3-5 yrs. As these seem to have the most repairs and very expensive parts.

Jake
 
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