appliance-repair.org program

blackhorse70

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Hi yall. I'm thinking about buying a program on the site appliance-repair.org. The guy selling it calls himself Uncle Harry, and he has 35 years experience in the business. His program is very comprehensive with manuals for just about all appliances, thousands of pictures online, a detailed business program etc. I have never fixed an appliance in my life, but I would like to get into this business. The cost is $1300. I'd appreciate any advice. Some of the things I'm concerned about are; are most transactions with customers good?...Can someone buy some old appliances, check them out, and after reading his books and other material jump into this business? :3:
 

Jake

Appliance Tech - Admin
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I would be very cautious about this kind of a program.

The best way to get into the appliance repair business is to work for an appliance repair company for awhile, so you can get the "HANDS ON" training thats so important.

Also check with your local community college, lots of them offer an appliance repair course at very low cost, most below $100.00 per course.

Thats how I started in 1987.

Jake
 

TheMechanic

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Aug 26, 2006
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learning appliance repair

I was going to buy an appliance repair business, but it was sold before I got my cash in it. I did have a chance to work with the owner for about a week. I myself am Mechancically inclined, mainly because I have studied mechanics and electrical princibles on my own. But, while I did have a chance to see this guy working on appliances, I did learn a few things. First, if you have any technical knowledge at all in electronics or mechanics or both you will have no problem in learning appliance repair. I think a course in repairing appliances would be a good start. But the cost will be at least 700 bucks for the whole course. I would check and make sure it is an easy to understand course. There are some ways to learn on the Internet. Like the Samurai repair forum. I haven't tried this guy's online information. You can become a member of his group for 49 bucks a year, which is better than paying 700 bucks for a course, but I don't know how the quality and ease of learning is with this guy. I have E Mailed him a few times to find out about his online Appliance learning experience, but he hasn't replied. I have found out that these appliance repair techs who have there own businesses won't tell you much, because they are afraid of the competition. So you won't get much from them. That is why I think a home study course or a college course would be a good idea. But again you will pay more for it. But as I said, learning how to repair appliances in my opinion is not that hard. There is a learning process, like any other new endeavor, but it can be learned from anyone who is willing to apply thereself. You can learn it. I would shop around and ask the school or person about there courses before paying money. If 700 bucks will pay for a good learning experience then it is worth it. One thing I will say if your planning on starting an appliance repair business, is do some market research before spending any money on learning the technical part of it. There may be to much competition already in your area. So, do a business plan first. Then decide if spending money for a course will be worth it. Otherwise your just learning how to fix your own washing machine at a considerable price.
 

lou4062

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I am curious to know IF anyone has tried this system and how it has worked out for them?
 

TheMechanic

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Uncle Harry and learning appliance repair

Your not alone in your search for a trustworthy appliance repair mentor. I am mechanically inclined myself. But as with any new endeavor, even for the mechanically inclined, there is still a learning curve. Troubleshooting is one thing, but becoming famillar with new gadgets can be overwhelming. I won't reccomend any person or trainer, because I to am searching for some good reference material, but I have heard some good things about Harry Raker. So, it might be worthwhile to check. I do know that a lot of the repairs done on appliances are simple repairs. Not all, but I would say 90% are mostly belt replacement, bushings, seals, lose connections (electrical contacts), bad heating elements, defrosting problems (refrigerators) and ignition starters (Gas stoves and ovens.) I had a chance to work with an appliance repair business for a week, and I was going to buy it, but I missed out on the purchase. So I am searching for a good program myself. It will be a toss up between Harry Raker and Jim Johnson. Jim Johnson is a technical writer, has a lot of books out on the subject and teaches and writes for corrospondent courses. Raker has a more down to earth approach for the beginner, while Jim Johnson material is focussed on the technical part of it. I would shop around, but you might want to look into these two guys for teaching material. I know, I'll probably get some bad replys on this one, so if anyone else can reccomend something else, by all means. But, I shouldn't say reccomend. I will mention one thing about Harry Raker, be carefull when talking to his so called students, I don't know about all of them. but I know for sure that some of them are paid to endorse his course. So, you got to look at it very carefully. So, I am not reccomending, only advising.
 

lou4062

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In the past I have tried a couple of Harry Rakers pdf manuals that I purchased online. There were fun to read but they seemed very outdated although the one I bought was not one of the detailed manuals that he sells. I also have purchased several books on appliance repair such as one by Jim Johnson but the date on this book was 1993. It was interesting reading it as I love reading any repair manual or forums such as these however,I feel a lot has changed in the past 13 years of appliance repair and this book is also outdated.
 

TheMechanic

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Books and Education

If your mechanicaly inclined, I don't think you will have a problem in repairing new appliances. They are basically the same as the older ones with a couple of exceptions. Direct drive motors, control boards instead of electrical timer motors and knowing the error codes. I know this because I to am doing some studying on Appliances and repairing them.

You can get different model numbers from Appliance repair forums like this one, just type the model number in, and you'll get the tech sheets, and it will show you exactly how to repair them, from the esterline charts to how to take them apart to how to repair and troubleshoot them. Couldn't be easier. Hope this helps!
 

lou4062

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I am mechanicaly inclined as I have worked on a few appliances and on automobiles. Right now I am working on a dehumidifier with digital display and think I am at a deadend, which is nothing new. I also visit appliance forums such as these and other repair websites. Applianceaid.com is one of the best resources for appliance repair in my estimation. It has user friendly pages and a lot of information that continually gets updated. Thank you for your imput.
 

TheMechanic

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Troubleshooting

Yea I know what you mean. I myself have to become familiar with any gizmo before I can figure it out. I have worked with an appliance expert for a while, and most of the repairs were simple. Not hard to figure out. But, I didn't go the whole route with him, so I am sure I missed a bunch I could have learned. I have repaired some equipment where I work, and it isn't appliance related, but the equipment does have control boards, motors and silinoids. Took me a while to figure it out, but after some troubleshooting I finally got it down. I think just getting in there and doing it is the best thing, after some learning curves are overcome of course. I think you'll figure out the Dehumidifier. After all what more can it be than a few electrical and mechanical princibles.
 

lou4062

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I wholeheartedly agree with you about "hands on training" being the best way to learn things. You can read a lot of information but until you actually start taking things apart I think you're missing something. Between your job and working along side a tech, it sounds like you got yourself a nice headstart in the craft. I have allways enjoyed fixing things for my friends and family especially if things work out. It just makes me feel good inside when you accomplish something for their benefit. Most of the repairs I have performed so far have been fairly easy as far as troubleshooting goes such as belt replacement, thawing out a frozen defrost drain, replacing a faulty ignitor. I'm not sure if this is the norm as far as a appliance repair techs day goes, but I remember you saying there were a lot of "common" repairs when you went out on calls. One other thing I failed to mention though in my case especially if it's automobile work, it probably takes me 2 to 3 hours longer to complete the job than it would take a tech doing the same repair. It drives my wife batty sometimes! Me too!
 

TheMechanic

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fixing things hands on

Well, I could have learned a lot more. But most of the repairs this guy did were fairly simple. Like you said, Belts, pulleys and heating elements in dryers. A few loose connections on motors. I was surprised to see that most of the Appliance calls were for late model appliances. There weren't many newer ones. I have seen experts do work on machinery that had to be returned because it wasn't repaired correctly. So, I think if you have enough knowledge in your head, I think you can figure it out even if your not an expert. Many times you think some people who work in the field know the stuff like the back of there hand, but you find out that they to have to use common sense and they make mistakes also. Trial and error I guess! But if you don't take the chance, well you'll never figure it out.
 

Econo Appliance

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Theoretical knowledge is very important, of course, but you won't be able to fix appliances without practical experience. Don't waste your money.

Try to work for a company, even for free if you are having trouble finding an employer, even if it is only for one month...
 

realdude

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Recommend Uncle Harry Masters Program

I am a past student of Harry Raker's Masters Program and highly recommend it. Although this home-study program isn't for everyone, if you are motivated to study all of the manuals (which I was because I wanted to make MONEY as quickly as possible), Harry's program is probably the cheapest and most effective way to get into the appliance business. After reading a few of his business manuals to learn what's needed to run a business, I read a few of the service manuals. Then I thought - I can really do this! I started repairing old washers and dryers that my relatives had given up on. Then, I sent out direct-mail flyers and postcards as specified in Harry's program. From that point on, I continued to get phone calls and referrals each week. I gained expertise with every service call. I've been in business about 3 years now, and my truck is paid off. I would advise anyone getting into the appliance repair business to have a high-school degree and attend some technical courses at a community college. A fairly decent background in electronics (being able to read schematics, etc.) will help greatly. Take at least one course in computers - the thought process is invaluable. You also have to be willing to get out of bed and make 5 or 6 calls a day to make money in this business. Harry's Masters Program is much more than a service manual. It teaches you how to run a business and make lots of money for your effort.

P.S. Don't bother with this program if can't work at it like any other part-time job. It requires commitment, a working vehicle, and at least a thousand bucks to do some advertising. It's like any other business start-up, you can monkey around or you can do it right.
 

uncleharry

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Reflections on Comments on my Program

Funny that someone would think that I would pay a past student to say nice things about my program. Actually never thought about it. No need to. The best advice for anyone interested in this great business is to listen to the two hours of testimonials at uncleharry.com. They pretty much speak for themselves.

Concerning how current my program is, I recently finished and uploaded (11/08) 200 service videos covering all the latest stuff like ADCs, Articas, Duets etc. All those videos come with the program. Plus, we really do have all the manuals and first hand knowledge because students continually trade what they are learning in the field.

Working temporarily for someone else is not a bad way to get started but very few of my hundreds of past students have actually done so. Go figure. They seem to do OK, cold turkey, doing it gradually on their own. Confidence seems to be the biggest hurdle because as any pro knows most of the repairs are not very hard. Once a new guy runs a few calls things smooth out.

There really seems to be very little available at local schools; at least as far as I can find. The little bit out there is purely technical and gives no help on the real stumbling blocks, marketing and pricing.

I honestly feel in this crummy economy, appliance repair is an untapped gold mine for the right guy. Little investment, exceptional hourly rates, no apprenticeship and a short startup period. What more can one ask!

Harry Raker
 

Jake

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Well, I'm kinda in between on this issue guys, I believe its very important to have the training half and half, between learning from classroom/videos and going out with someone who you can learn from.

Back in 1987 when I first started fixing appliances, it was more of going out with a senior tech for 10 months and learning "hands on" training, hardly any classroom/video experience at all, but now I see that when newer products come out its very important to get up to date on classroom/video experience.

Hell, back in 1987 there wasn't any refrigerant EPA laws, when we changed compressors, the R-12/R-22 just went in the air, and we never thought about it hurting our environment. Things were very straight forward and simple back then. Once the government started mandating energy savings and refrigerant laws and with the appliance manufacturers going towards electronic/computerized boards in the 90's I saw the change begin to turn, where Montgomery Ward was putting us techs. more and more into the classroom for all day training sessions on the new changes and electronic/computized products.

With all the foreign appliances(Bosch, LG, Samsumg) coming in now training is a must in the classroom/videos for us older generation techs. I would still be more than happy to get the classroom/video training if I was with Sears still, but since I started my own appliance repair business in 2005, and getting this website going, I really don't have the time needed to learn the foreign appliances.

Jake
 

ArchAngel

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May 13, 2009
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Thanks!

Thanks for the link, Bookmarked it ;)
Yes,
I see this is an old thread... I'm new to the board, but wanted to give a shoutout to all who wrote on the thread, lots of info. Thank you!

I'm starting my own business, and have much the same background as you Jake! hands on 6-7 years mom and pop businesses and the Sears 5 years, now branching out... bit nervous economy and all, but pretty confident it'll work out with some legwork and perserverence

Would love to hear more advice if you have any... am thinking of upgrading but haven't figured that one out yet, only been a member like 15 minutes.

Thanks guys for the links and thoughts. looks to be a great blog/webpage to be a member of.

blessings-
ArchAngel
 

Jake

Appliance Tech - Admin
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McMullen Valley, Arizona
Hi ArchAngel,

Good to hear your starting to branch out on your own.:)

I'll upgrade you for free since your a service tech.:)

Just place ads in your local newpaper in the service directory, then in your local phone book, word of mouth is the best way to get lots of business/service calls.:)

Jake
 

ArchAngel

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May 13, 2009
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Houston, TX
Hi ArchAngel,

Good to hear your starting to branch out on your own.:)

I'll upgrade you for free since your a service tech.:)

Just place ads in your local newpaper in the service directory, then in your local phone book, word of mouth is the best way to get lots of business/service calls.:)

Jake

WOW Jake!
that was fast!
Thanks for the encouragement, and I don't feel right about the free thing... but thanks for offering... umm yah, still in the midst of leaving the Sears thing- is kinda scary with the economy and all but deep inside just says its the thing to do.
great advice.. I was wondering on where to put advertising dollars, our local phonebook already came out but I've already lined up to come out next January and the local paper is going to be doing a article on us and yes, will advertise with them for sure... I'm hoping word of mouth definitely counts, I already have tons of folks begging for me to do this, repeat customers.
Very cool that we have similar backgrounds, I'm going to enjoy this board! Never knew there was stuff like this on the net and wish I had found it years ago!
gotta run, time to put the kiddos in bed
will be back tomorrow- btw Nice To Meet Ya!!!:)

Archangel
 
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