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Broan Range Hood Evolution 3 QP3 Series - Fan does not want to turn off

Opihi59

Premium Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2018
Messages
66
Location
Hawaii
Sad thing about this appliance/unit. It's a simple concept, fan, lights....... but it had to be overcomplicated with a circuit board, and the boards are very fragile and perishable for some reason. I still am using mine w heat sensor unplugged, and I can use it, though it gives error code and the time display doesn't work, but honestly I didn't purchase it for a clock especially when my range and microwave have these already. And I am also disinclined to purchase a $125 part likely to fail again.
A friend purchased a similar Broan unit, and just about 14 months later the lights would flicker on and off. I replaced her "mother board" at around $120 for the part and it worked........all of 10 months, now the lights do not function at all, so another motherboard. This really is a problem. When this next one goes out, it will be kicked to the curb and another unit/different brand will be purchased and installed.
Were I able to look at the board, visually identify the dead component, purchase that and replace it in the circuit board I would be content with that. However, nothing visually looks amiss, and I lack capability to do an electronic autopsy on it, so the only remedy is to purchase the entire board. I have, on other boards, been able to identify blown capacitors and replace them which fixed the board, but on these boards, I have no idea which component has gone bad. Likely there are those who do have this capability, but then it would cost more than a new board, so we go in circles again.
Just give me a hood with a fan, lights and on/off switches and skip these circuit boards. They just don't last, and these are supposed to be high-end appliances.
 

Joanangela24

Premium Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2020
Messages
3
Location
Venice Florida
Hi Nate - Please read my previous post to see if this approach works for you. The cost is minimal - just the price of a remote control unit - which you can buy at any Home Depot in the garden department.
 

The Fang

Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2020
Messages
1
Location
x
Not a follow on to the previous posts. But this is the only forum i have been able to find regarding Range Hoods.

This is a query. We are currently doing a major, back to the brick, renovation including the kitchen.

The old kitchen did not have a range hood and we will be installing one in the new.

The problem I am running into is getting a straight answer. It would be preferred if the exhaust motor could be remotely mounted, which I know can be done. My understanding is it usually mounted in the attic or on the roof. This would involve having the hood exhaust duct run vertically through the house. This is not an option in our situation.

Our hood exhaust will be going either vertical for 2-3' and then out through the exterior wall or straight out from the hood. So in this scenario can the hood exhaust motor be wall mounted outside?
 

JazzFan

Premium Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2021
Messages
2
Location
San Diego
I cut off the thermistor (temperature sensor) and soldered in a 10k ohm resistor. I have worked in electronics for 40 years and could not find a schematic for the circuit board and can not help those with circuit board issues without personally troubleshooting a failed board. Most components can fail due to excess heat, however, cheap capacitors or low-quality semiconductors are common failure points. I have saved $20 for replacing the heat sensor or $220 for the circuit board. Also, my wife is happy because she hated and never asked for a smart range hood that makes adjustments. Replacing the heat sensor with a resistor has the same effect as pulling out the sensor, except, now there is no error code and the clock panel works. Additionally, I did not have to add fancy remotes or additional switches to disable the fan motor. It's a cheap 15 cent fix if you don't have electronic components lying around like me and not hard to accomplish. It's not rocket science. For those with basic electronics, a 10k ohm resistor has brown, black, orange, and gold bands. Good luck, and I no longer hate my hood and there is peace in my house.

10K_RESISTER__59519.1481931056.1280.1280.jpg
 
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Opihi59

Premium Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2018
Messages
66
Location
Hawaii
JazzFan, thanks for that tidbit. I'll give it a try. Since I'm not very smart (but I can lift heavy things......) where do I solder this component in? Chop out the heat sensor, and connect this between the two wires??? I can get this likely at a local store and don't mind giving this a shot.
I've had to figure out how to fix several mother boards that have given up the ghost in short order, and I absolutely loathe "smart" systems since they force the consumer to either buy new, or pay high $$ for a repair service to replace a significantly expensive and similarly flawed mother board. If you can elaborate on your repair, I'll give it a shot and post back in this thread with photos and stuff, and so long as I still have eyebrows following the repair, I won't throw out my shoulder patting myself on the back but will point folks in your way.
I ended up paying over $400 for a new mother board for a wine fridge that had failed for the second time in a few years.......I saved the old and may give repair of that a go. I simply hate motherboards, and for the love of God, just give me an analog item with an on/off switch.............
 

JazzFan

Premium Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2021
Messages
2
Location
San Diego
Yes, the best way is to unscrew the heat sensor and let it dangle. I always recommend that everyone turn off the power for safety reasons. Cut off the sensor wire about 3-4 inches from the sensor end. This will give you room to re-splice if this does not work and you want to reuse the sensor. Part the sensor wire about 1 1/2 inches back and strip about 3/8 of an inch of insulation to expose the wire. Attach or twist the two resistor leads to the two senor wires. Turn the fan back on from the main power of your home, the panel clock should be back working. Then turn on the fan and use the controls on test. If this works, use heat shrink or electrical tape to cover the resistor and exposed wires. Then, tuck everything back up and close up the fan. Keep asking if you need more details.
 
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Opihi59

Premium Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2018
Messages
66
Location
Hawaii
Okay, it's on my "list" of things to do.......I will seek out the component and give it a shot. I'll take photos and post back in with results.......just may take me a while to get a round tuit of course. But I won't leave everyone dangling forever.
 
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