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CGS990SET8SS GE Lower oven trips breaker

Ernest

Premium Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2019
Messages
3
Location
Horse Shoe, NC
Model Number
CGS990SET8SS
Brand
GE
Age
1-5 years
Our 3 year old GE oven started tripping the circuit breakers. It can heat up for 3-5 minutes and trip the GFI or run perfectly, at it's option. The GFI has been replaced, other outlets on other circuits have produced the same effect. An appliance tech has checked the components and found everything in order. The oven has performed flawlessly for the past 3 years. Would a faulty oven control board cause this to happen?
 

rickgburton

Appliance Tech - Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 11, 2006
Messages
37,054
Location
Murray, Utah 84107, United States
. It can heat up for 3-5 minutes and trip the GFI
Almost all manufactures recommend not using a GFI circuit for a major appliance. They're too sensitive for current leakage. Take the range off the GFI and use a regular outlet. That should solve your problem.
 

rickgburton

Appliance Tech - Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 11, 2006
Messages
37,054
Location
Murray, Utah 84107, United States
You need to know how a GFI works and the fact that your range is 3 years old. A GFCI uses a current transformer to detect the difference between the current supplied to the load and the neutral current returning from the load. Ideally, this difference should be 0 because both currents cancel each other. If there is a current difference, it becomes the inputs to a comparator within the GFCI.The comparator changes states when the difference is around 6 mA (6/1000 of one Ampere). When the comparator changes states, it disconnects the power from the output of the GFCI.

Ground faults occur when current can find a path to ground. The usual ground-fault suspects include worn wire insulation, conductive dusts, water, or other “soft grounds.” Another name for a ground fault is current leakage. Although wiring insulation is designed to keep electricity in the wire/conductor, all insulators have some conductivity. Even air is not a perfect insulator. Insulation conducts current through both electrically resistive and capacitive paths. If the wire insulation is old or damaged, its resistance is lower and current leakage could become substantial. The wire insulation protecting longer wires/conductors has higher capacitance, which can cause even more current leakage. On GFCI-protected circuits, current leakage causes ghost tripping. When troubleshooting “ghost” trips, sometimes looking for the current leaking culprit can be almost impossible without specialized test equipment.

GFCI -1.jpg
 
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