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Dacor wall oven (ECS230) cutting off at high temps - cooling fan not blowing

N.V.

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Oct 30, 2017
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8
Location
Georgia
My Dacor double wall oven (ECS230) has begun cutting off when a high temp is used for extended periods. I frequently do pizza nights for our large family, which requires max temp (555 degrees, pure convection mode) for a couple of hours. The oven has previously handled this without any problems but lately, it's begun blocking power to any of the heating elements after about 90 minutes.

The proximate cause of this is the tripping of the high-limit switch. On the chance that ours was failing, I replaced it (after resetting it a couple of times) with a new one. However, the same behavior occurred with the new switch. That's when I realized the cooling fans for both the upper and lower ovens are failing to come on as they should. Consequently, there is an excess heat buildup over time and the high limit switch is tripped.

My issue is that I need to determine if the problem is bad blower fan motors (both failing at the same time seems odd) or, perhaps, a bad relay board - or two. This particular oven features a more complex relay board for the upper oven, and a more basic one for the lower oven.

Here's my question: What is the best way to determine if the problem lies with failed cooling fans OR the relay boards that activate them? My thought was that if the fans can be shown to work, that will leave the relay board(s) as the cause, and I can replace/repair as warranted. But how do I bypass the relay boards to test the fans?

One fellow I spoke with at a big box hardware store (he was an appliance tech for several years) suggested using a "cheater" cord to bypass the relay board(s) and put 120 VAC on the fans directly. That sounds like it would work, but I have never done such a thing. I get the concept well enough and would be willing to try it if there were a decent tutorial so I don't fry an oven component -- or myself! Failing that, though, would a simple continuity test with a multimeter be sufficient to show that the fans are likely working?

I would SERIOUSLY appreciate any advice on how to proceed. I need to get back to pizza making!
 

Dan O.

Appliance Tech
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Ontario, Canada
I have no knowledge of that range and have no access to service info on it so I can't be of specific help. I can only give general tips.

What is the best way to determine if the problem lies with failed cooling fans OR the relay boards that activate them?


*I* would test for power at the motor. Power there but the motor not functioning points to a problem with the motor. NO power when it should be running would point to a problem in the control, or the wiring, or any other components that might also be in the electrical circuit to the fan.

I can not tell you how to go about that.


Dan O.
 

N.V.

Premium Member
Joined
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Messages
8
Location
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Thanks, Dan. I was able to test the fan motor with a test cord. It worked just fine, so I'm pretty sure my problem lies in the main relay board (which accommodates the cooling fans for both lower and upper ovens - neither of which is switching on).

I wonder if you'd venture an opinion as to whether it's a better option to repair/refurbish the existing board (half the cost, but it's 20 years old and has been subjected to a fair bit of high-temp use) or buy a new one (twice the cost but a quicker repair)? I'd love to get your take and know if there is a general consensus as to whether repairing/refurbishing these relay boards is a good idea. The price difference here is about $200, btw.

Thanks so much!
 

Dan O.

Appliance Tech
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Messages
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was able to test the fan motor with a test cord. It worked just fine

That doesn't necessarily mean there isn't something else in the fan's circuit stopping its functioning.

Most technicians prefer new parts. That way if the problem (or others) persist, they don't have to recheck all their work to confirm their diagnosis, wasting time they're not going to get paid for. (It happens with new parts too, by way less frequently.)

I usually only recommend having a component rebuilt if a new one is no longer available or is price prohibitive. Of course, if it's not my time that's involved, do whatever you prefer.

Good luck!
 
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N.V.

Premium Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2017
Messages
8
Location
Georgia
That doesn't necessarily mean there isn't something else in the fan's circuit stopping its functioning.
True, but I don't know how to test for/diagnose an alternative problem (I'm certainly open to any advice). Putting all the circumstances together, though, it sure seems like the main relay board is the most likely culprit.

Thanks for the input on new vs. reconditioned.
 

N.V.

Premium Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2017
Messages
8
Location
Georgia
True, but I don't know how to test for/diagnose an alternative problem (I'm certainly open to any advice).
Of course, I will perform a continuity test. But assuming that shows no problem, I wonder if you are suggesting some other kind of potential circuit problem?
 

Dan O.

Appliance Tech
Staff member
Joined
Oct 9, 2004
Messages
6,321
Location
Ontario, Canada
There could be something in the circuit between the electronic control and the motor that is causing it to not run. I don't have access to its wiring diagram to see if their might be any possible suspects to check. There could also be a failure of the wiring itself.

A sure fire indicator might be if someone checked for power to the fan circuit right at the control board in question and right at the time it should be functioning. No output power might be a more definitive sign of a control failure.

Dan O.
 
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