• ** REMEMBER! **The microwave can still shock you even unplugged!!

    ALWAYS discharge the high-voltage capacitor first if you even think your hands will come close to any HIGH VOLTAGE components.

    Jeff mentions this: Anything in the high voltage ( magnetron, capacitor, diode, wires to and from ):
    ...Use a metal ( not the shiny chrome type ) screw driver with a insulated handle to short across ( touch both at the same time ) the terminals of the high voltage capacitor to discharge it.

    From Jeff's site: http://www.applianceaid.com/component-testing.php

    Jake

Does an extra 18 ohms matter on a microwave fan motor?

BigKetchup

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Messages
13
Location
Las Vegas
The manual says that the fan motor terminals should produce 97.4 ohms, but the multimeter reads 116 (that's with the fan still attached if it matters). Should I replace the motor? When I did get my microwave to turn on, the fan did spin and the terminals received 120 volts.


Thanks.
 

jeff1

Appliance Tech - Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 10, 2004
Messages
23,923
Location
Ontario, Canada
Hi,

When I did get my microwave to turn on, the fan did spin and the terminals received 120 volts.
Should I replace the motor?
Nope, I would not replace the fan motor if it turns on and runs.

jeff.
 
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