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FIXED FFRE1233S1 Frigidaire Window AC - Help wiring Window a/c blower Motor

JimRM

Premium Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2020
Messages
9
Location
Albany NY
Model Number
FFRE1233S1
Brand
Frigidaire
Age
1-5 years
Hello folks, thanks in advance for the help.

I’ve got a blower motor and impeller from a Frigidaire 550-sq ft Window Air Conditioner (115-Volt; 12000-BTU) ENERGY STAR that I’d like to use as a vent hood fan. I threw away the capacitor and control board before deciding to do this.

So I’m trying to determine the way to properly wire this so I don’t burn up the motor and so it operates at maximum efficiency and need your help doing this.

I’ve figured out the start capacitor would need to be a 250v 5uf capacitor.

I’m unclear if there should also be a run capacitor and switch to disengage the start capacitor. The wiring diagram on the motor housing indicates there is some sort of switch I think. I know that the motor itself does not have a centrifugal switch. Looking at the wiring diagram for the a/c unit I see there is a switch of some sort that the main power goes to (main power?) before going to the compressor and on to the capacitor. I sort of doubt this is the disengage switch for the start cap.

Wiring this without the control board I assume the power from the 115v wall outlet would go between blue and red with blue being neutral and red being line And ground to the motor housing. The capacitor would go between black and blue with the positive lead connected to the blue wire. All correct?

I’ve attached all the pertinent photos.

Thanks for the help!
 

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Dan O.

Appliance Tech
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The wiring should go like this:

Motor wiring.jpg

BTW. It uses a RUN capacitor, not a Start capacitor.



Dan O.
 

JimRM

Premium Member
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Jun 6, 2020
Messages
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Location
Albany NY
Thank you! I wasn’t originally planning on ordering a multi-position switch since I don’t foresee using at slower speeds. Since the option exists and I need to buy an on/off switch anyway figured I’d go ahead and get a 4 position switch and use the multi speed function. I assume that doesn’t require additional electronics . Guessing it has to do with the number of windings each lead is tied into or something internal to the motor. If it does I’ll just wire them all into one pole as your drawing shows.

I purchased a 5uf 450v capacitor designed for a ceiling fan. Two of them for $9. Was the best deal. I know the capacitor voltage rating just needs to be higher than the motor is rated for.
 

Dan O.

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JimRM said:
If it does I’ll just wire them all into one pole as your drawing shows.


That's not what I intended to show or there would be solid lines connecting all. Choose the speed you want and connect only that wire.


Dan O.
 

JimRM

Premium Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2020
Messages
9
Location
Albany NY
The wiring should go like this:

View attachment 50746

BTW. It uses a RUN capacitor, not a Start capacitor.



Dan O.
Hey Dan O. I finally have all the components in hand and have rebuilt the fan housing to accommodate the motor and impeller. Preparing to wire this up. On DC capacitors there is a positive and negative lead. I take it that’s not important on AC run capacitors? I don’t see any markings whatsoever on the capacitor to indicate the direction of current flow. Have to assume it doesn’t matter.

I was also wondering, if I’m using the original fan blade, if I need to be concerned with current draw on the motor? The only thing that would be different from it’s normal use is that I’m introducing a pleated heater air filter in the air flow path to help filter out paint particles before they hit the fan blade. Otherwise the air flow is unrestricted. I suppose the filter isn’t that much different from the plastic filter that came with the air conditioner.

The housing itself is a bit smaller and tighter than the original styrofoam housing that was in the air conditioner unit. Not by much. The spiral is smaller. Might be noisier as a result I suppose.
 

JimRM

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Albany NY
Forgot I have a friend who is HVAC repair install guy. Got the answer re: cap polarity from him. It’s Working great! Thanks Again for the help with wiring and choice of capacitor!

 

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Dan O.

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No there is no polarity. (I didn't think there was with DC voltages either, not like a diode.).

Glad you got it working. I couldn't view your video though.

Dan O.
 

JimRM

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Messages
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Location
Albany NY
Thanks for the reply. There is polarity on DC capacitors. The negative leg is usually clearly marked on the package side within a stripe and negative symbol. It might be possible to get DC capacitors that don’t require polarity but I’ve never seen them. I’d call my DC electronics knowledge low intermediate. Have made some fairly complex circuits and designed a couple. With regard to AC/high voltage I still consider myself a beginner. Wired a shop for 120 and 240 (welder) and was inspected and approved by licensed electrician prior to final inspection which got approved but would never fully trust my work without verifying by multiple knowledgeable sources.

re: video - yeah same here. Might just delete it. Suspect it’s a website file size limitation.
 

Jake

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Refresh this page Dan, I fixed his video, It plays fine for me.

Jake
 

Jake

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Glad to help Jim.(y)

Jake
 

Dan O.

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That's nice. My buddy could have used that for his paint booth. We gave him a couple used motors from scrapped dryers that have a similar fan set up. Yours is more ingenious.

I think the size of that filter is kind of a waste though. Only the area of the filter directly in front of the squire cage fan hole will be used to filter circulated air.

Dan O.
 
Last edited:

JimRM

Premium Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2020
Messages
9
Location
Albany NY
That's nice. My buddy could have used that for his paint booth. We gave him a couple used motors from scrapped dryers that have a similar fan set up. Yours is more ingenious.

I think the size of that filter is kind of a waste though. Only the area of the filter directly in front of the squire cage fan hole will be used to filter circulated air.

Dan O.
Thanks again for your help Dan. Literally couldn’t have done it without the info you provided. Thank you.

Point taken about the size of the filter. There were reasons behind it. I’m sure there are smaller filters available but this was smallest (Filtrete 10”x 20”) I could find at Lowe’s that’s a common size. Also the filter is not right up against the fan intake. It’s abput 3” away. My logic was that the distance would help distribute and equalize the pressure somewhat knowing full well there’d be a “hotspot” right in front of the intake. Also was thinking once the hotspot gets clogged up the air will be drawn from other unclogged areas of the filter. This likely diminishes efficiency though. If I get really ambitious once one end of the filter clogs I could spin the filter 180deg since the intake is off center. By spinning the filter I’d have a clear area in front of the intake. Of course you’re right my design isn’t perfect. It works ok for a first try at it.

Would love to see your buddy’s design.

Btw I ordered a watt meter to see what kind of power the motor draws without the filter there and with. The motor gets warm after 10 minutes. Not sure if that’s expected behavior or caused by my barnyard engineering. Lol. I did reverse the rotor in the stator so that the fan is scooping the air outward rather than spinning against the housing spiral. The air output is a LOT higher now. Seems to work ok except that there’s occasionally a very slight rattling noise in the motor. Could be debris from me being sloppy during reassembly or the bearing I replaced is not high performance enough. It’s a high performance skateboard bearing. Not exactly top performance. Guess I’ll find out. HAHAHA I noticed the bearings on each side of the rotor magnet are not the same distance from the magnet so the rotor position is not completely centered in the stator field. Off by 1/4” or less. It spins freely just not perfectly aligned. I’m certain the motor was not intended to be reversible. As I said seems to work. In theory I could cut other raceways for the bearing E-clip stops to shift the rotor magnet over that 1/4” or less.
 
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