FIXED Food in Refrigerator Freezing

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jlarish

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GE Profile Arctica
Model: PSI23SGNAFBS
Within the past week we noticed that items in the deli drawer were freezing and that the indicated temperature in the refrigerator had dropped to 34 degrees. The freezer temperature was normal. I increased the set temperature to the refrigerator to above 40 degrees and the indicated temperature dropped to 33 degrees. Nothing else has frozen, yet, but the temperature seems to be dropping regardless of the set temperature.

I saw the posts regarding the door damper and was unsure if it applied to my model.

Suggestions on troubleshooting?

Thanks.
Jim
 

Jake

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Yes Jim,

Sounds like your damper door is broken on yours as well.

Pull top two shelves out 2 ". Pull rear tower assembly slightly forward with both hands, move to the left and the right to expose the two screws that secure the duct assembly , also remove both screws that secure the duct to the ceiling.

Here's what GE Jim said here in post #43 of our main thread on this issue:
FIXED Food in Refrigerator Freezing

The damper door breaks off from the motor so you will not see it move...It is laying in there and when you take the whole assembly out it will be obvious to see what happened..You need to take out the top shelf of the fridge and then take off the air duct on the back of fresh food wall to get at the screws...
Here's the Damper assembly for your model(Comes with complete instructions):
Damper Control Assembly WR49X10091 Order now for same day shipping. 365 day return policy. RepairClinic.com


Jake
 

jlarish

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The new damper appears to have fixed the problem. Thanks for the help. Now on to the Whirlpool gas dryer that stopped heating yesterday...
 

Jake

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Excellent, glad to hear that.:)

Jake
 

jlarish

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Continuing issue

So, replacing the damper has made the temperature display in the fridge hold to the preset temperatures (37 fridge, 0 freezer), but I am still getting freezing of foods in the deli drawer. I haven't noticed anything frozen in the other drawers. The deli drawer is pretty full. I also noticed that the light for the 3.0 lbs Express Thaw remains on, even if I cycle through the times until it turns off. The next time I open the fridge it is always on. I honestly don't remember if this is the normal operation.

Help?

Thanks.
 

Jake

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Thats odd, I'm not sure what else could be causing this, except there is a kit for this, but I'm not sure it applies to your deli drawer.

Freezing in cripsers G.E artica:
Models Affected: All 23 25 27 and 29 cubic foot electronic side-by-side refrigerator units with plastic Liners manufactured in 2001 or later. This includes all Profile- (Arctica and Eterna") models Consumers have called with reports of freezing in the Vegetable (middle) pan or the CustomCool M (bottom) pan , frozen water tank or frozen water filter.Freezing in the pans , a frozen water tank or a frozen water filter is caused by excessive airflow from the vents in the tower.

To eliminate these freezing issues , install kit WR49X10045

Follow the instructions included in the kit.

Jake
 

Fuse

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LAFB
Good evening.

I'm another poor chap that inherited a GE Profile Artica when buying the house. Same deal, entire fridge side is consistently at 30 or below regardless of set temp.

Model: PSS25NGMAWW
Serial: GA410413

I can't tell yet if it will freeze veggies since I am not in the house full-time, but can you ascertain if it is one problem (damper, or the veggie drawer fix), or both?

I thank you all in advance.

v/r,
Chris
 

Jake

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Ok Chris, your model uses the same damper assembly thats in post#83 above.

Read what I mentioned in that post to see if your damper door is broken.

Jake
 

Grateful Reader

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I created this account for the purpose of thanking this forum, and even made a little donation. My GE arctica has had freezing events in the food compartment on and off for a long time. We paid $1700 for the thing ten years ago. It has scuff marks on it because I kicked it every time I walked by it, I hated it so much. Yesterday, thanks to this forum, I replaced the housing at the top rear that cntains the little fan and flap valve servo. It is now controlling at Setpoint! I was lining up repair places and getting ready to empty the checkbook.

May I please vent after years of frustration?

The design and material of the servo flap valve: This is a part CRITICAL for the operation of the appliance. The injection-molded plastic mounting arm had cracked and broken off on one side. This explains the intermittant failures.

I have dealt with GE on the corporate level, and they can be a pretty hard-nosed outfit. I hope, in this case, they take the person responsible for designing that servo assembly, give them a demerit for 'Crimes against Engineering' and force them to read _"Shigley's Mechanical Engineering_" at gunpoint, if needed. Failing that, get them far away from the security cameras, and make it look like an accident.
Imagine the many frustrated users, all the Warranty repairs, all the repair bills, and all the ruined food, the loss of Good Will and reputation, just because one critical part was designed and built like a Wal-Mart Cat Toy.

I am writing this in a happy mood, because, thanks to this forum, it is fixed. Imagine what I would have written last week! The Police would have come.
 

Jake

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Thanks, glad our forum helped you fix yours.:)

Yes, GE quality has gone down hill since the late 1980's when they had their first massive recall on the rotary compressors they started using in their refrigerators instead of the piston compressors that were proven extremely reliable.

This was an attempt to save money in manufacturing costs, but it backfired. They learned from that and actually did better in 1990's, but things went south again in the 2000's from that damper motor problem you experienced and the motherboard issue most have experienced.

Jake
 

Grateful Reader

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Thanks, glad our forum helped you fix yours.:)


This was an attempt to save money in manufacturing costs, but it backfired. They learned from that and actually did better in 1990's, but things went south again in the 2000's from that damper motor problem you experienced and the motherboard issue most have experienced.

Jake
I find it worrying that a company who makes medical imaging devices, nuclear reactors, and turbines could do something like this.

I know in our dealings with them, cost containment was always an issue, but that is not all unusual. When a huge company can save a dollar a unit, and they make a million units, they saved a million dollars for bonuses for the morons who designed this part.

Well, I'll calm down in a few more days after I see it still nailed dead at the setpoint, as it is again this morning. it never worked this well, even when new. Maybe the part disengaged when the unit was transported and delivered, though problems did not really begin appearing till we had it a couple of years, safely beyond the 1-Year Warranty.

The specific failure was the small protrusion that engages a dimple opposite the servo shaft had slipped out, so the flap was supported and driven only from its mounting on the servo shaft. Who can imagine how long this has been going on!
The resulting cantilever and intermittant jamming, at 0°F, resulted in radial strains on the keyed bore (two flats) which eventually caused failure of the hub on the injection molded flap valve. The broken piece was found laying sadly next to the servo shaft.
The part appears to be ABS, a good choice. It should not have failed.
 
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My feelings closely match those of "Grateful Reader" above. My industrial and aerospace experience with GE in the past has been reasonably good, which is what lead me to buy all of their higher-end kitchen appliances when I did ten years ago or so. The fact that they're still functioning is testament that they're not complete garbage, but having been inside them, I am disappointed that they aren't made a bit more robustly. Not only could materials be better (considering the cost) but small details that are overlooked wouldn't have cost them anything more to make. . .

My example is this little air door that failed. My refrigerator started freezing/ruining food probably in the third or fourth year of ownership. It frustrated me, since this thing was like $2200 when I bought it new, but I figured it was a result of putting too much food in the unit, putting away warm, high mass grocery items right next to the thermistors, etc. Eventually I realized that it had nothing to do with how we were using it. An internet search lead me to this and other forums discussing the failure of the blend door. I was able to largely avoid frozen stuff by raising the temperature setpoints as high as they'd go for several years now, only intermitantly freezing things on the fresh food side. My wife has been threatening to buy another $2000+ refrigerator if I didn't fix this one, so I decided it was finally time to act.

Being the technical person that I am, I wanted to see what broke exactly before I called in the order for the $120+ parts assembly to "fix it." What I found was that the little black plastic door had indeed broken, but that the servo and the little muffin fan functioned perfectly. I read that some people had glued theirs back together with some measure of success, but in most cases broke again down the road anyway. A better repair method would be to "weld it" much like you would a metal part. I decided to roll the dice and attempt to repair the actual broken part, rather than buy an entire assembly.

I purchased two different plastic welding kits from my local glorious Chinese bargain tool store (Harbor Freight.) I bought the one that looks like a large-ish soldering iron with a flat triangle shaped foot, as well as one of the forced air versions, plus a package of assorted filler materials. The little door is molded "PC" which stands for polycarbonate. The filler material to use for this is the same as ABS, and was one of the three varieties in the little package of plastic welding rods. My door had split on the bottom where a round shaft with two opposing flats both provide the means of support and positioning the door. It cracked exactly in the corner of one of the flats across to the thinnest part of the OD of the molded cylinder (outside of the bore?) I used a small alligator clip from an electrical test lead set to hold the broken piece against the remainder of the door as I worked. I started at the backside of the bore, opposite of where the little plastic shaft enters, fusing the base material back together and adding a generous gusset using the filler rod to the back part, blending it into the spline of the door. I then re-fused the crack along both sides of the cylindrical portion, then built it up with more of the filler rod. I'd estimate that I added another 0.060" to the outside of the part that broke, and blended it further into the actual door to give it some strength.

To put it all back together, you have to remove the four screws that hold the "door box" onto the servo housing. Also, the little plastic shaft that supports and turns the doors can be pulled out of the servo, and will make reinsertion into the bottom of the door much easier. I put everything together, ran the servo test ten or so times, looked at it again to make sure it didn't crack apart, and all looks well. I spent a little over $20 for the welding kit and rods to fix this, so I figure I saved at least $100 off the cost of the entire assembly, plus the usual retail markup, plus the labor to pay somebody to put it together, blah blah blah. Really, not a big deal. I kick myself for having procrastinated this for so long. Honestly, I'd consider fixing more of these little doors for people if I could figure out a reasonable way to charge for it, etc. I'm sure I could do it a lot cheaper than replacing the entire assembly.
 
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