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FIXED Foolish Question: When was my new KRFC704FSS03 KitchenAid refrigerator manufactured?

Ladd

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May 30, 2021
Messages
9
Location
Maryland
Model Number
KRFC704FSS03
Brand
KitchenAid
Age
Less than 1 year
Just took delivery of our new KitchenAid KRFC704FSS03 French Door Refrigerator and was wondering when it might have been manufactured. There are multiple sites on the Internet that either tell me how to figure this out or have me put in a model number/serial number and then tells me the date. Unfortunately, The sites that tell me how to figure it out don't make sense and the ones that outright tell me say it was manufactured in 1997 or 2016 which I really hope is not true.

If there is someone in the know could you please enlighten me? Thanks.

Model: KRFC704FSS03
S/N: KA1504704

Added complete model number
 

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Jake

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@Dan O. has the best appliance age tool on earth here: http://www.appliance411.com/service/date-code.php

According to the serial number this product may have been manufactured in Columbia, SC, April of 1991 or 2021.

So since its impossible for it to be a 1991, then it has to be April 2021.:)

Jake
 

Dan O.

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That model number is incorrect. It's missing a letter.

KRFC704_SS03. The closest I found KRFC704FSS03

The 2021 date is likely correct for it.


BTW. The other note refers to the model design, not when it was made. ie. I had a 2005 model car that was actually made in 2004.

The updated explanation will soon read:
This product design may have been introduced for the 1997 or 2016 model year and manufactured close to or after that general time period.

The base model was first introduced for the 2016 model year. That's not when it was made but just the first year sold in stores.

The last number of your model, # 3, indicates it is the 4th generation of that model. The first year that appliance design was sold the model number would have ended ...FSS00. The next time they produced that model the version number would change to ...FSS01 and so on. So the ...SS03 model designation is version 4 and could easily be made 4+ years after the initial release of that product design (2016).

PS. Appliance models with a higher version number mean they've been on the market for a longer time. They're likely a reliable model which has had most of the kinks worked out of their design.

JFYI

Dan O.
 
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Ladd

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Nothing like screwing up my very first post on this forum asking for help. :-(
I'm looking at the paper on which I wrote down the model number and it clearly shows an "F" in there. That acronym EBCAK certainly applies! (error between chair and keyboard)

So yes, the full model number is: KRFC704FSS03

Dan O. answered my next question as to if the "003" meant it was a later version of the original model design and therefore might possibly not have some of the issues I've read that earlier models have had.

Thanks for the full explanations!
 

Dan O.

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Ladd said:
the "003" meant it was a later version of the original model design and therefore might possibly not have some of the issues I've read that earlier models have had.

Exactly. The first year it was on the market they found some deficiencies. They later corrected them and released the next version. And so on. While the basic design (size, style, features, etc.) remained basically the same.

I had thought of recommending consumers look for that indicator before buying a new appliance but it might not be that easy the way sales are handled these days. Even if the manufacturer was currently shipping version 4 of a product, that doesn't necessarily mean the dealer or the warehouse has that newest version on hand to ship.

I think you likely have a reasonably stable appliance model. Hopefully it won't give you much trouble over its lifespan.

Dan O.
 

Ladd

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I did a ton of research on the Internet trying to figure out what to buy to replace our 30-year old KitchenAid side-by-side refrigerator that was noisily dying. What I found was that no matter what brand or model I looked at, each had a significant number of one or two star reviews.

I was shocked when I watched a video of a dealer describing one particular brand/model as having a sterling reputation as it had ONLY a 23.x% service rate in the first year. OMG: this guy is ecstatic that ONLY almost a quarter of the units sold needed servicing in the first year.

That's when I realized that I know nothing about appliance reliability, no matter what I buy nor how much I spend, and if it turns out that I have a reasonable chance of purchasing a horror story no matter what I get, I might as well buy what I want and take my chances.

The fact that the new refrigerator is a fourth-generation of the model offers hope that some (many? most?) of the bugs might have been worked out. I realize that my original refrigerator lasting 30 years is WAY out at the tail end of the bell curve and I shouldn't expect that performance again, but I would at least like to avoid the numerous teeth-knashing problems I've read about.
 

Dan O.

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With the electronics used in appliances these days, they are all very susceptible. The best thing you can do to add to the longevity of a refrigerator is clean the condenser regularly and don't let problems fester. Have any issues looked into in a timely fashion.

A whole home surge protector is also a good investment to protect all your electronics.

Good luck!

Dan O.
 

Ladd

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Thanks for the advice re: cleaning the condenser. What do you consider "regularly"? We are a household of two people, no kids, no pets so dust, grime and hair are minimal.

Given the cost of the refrigerator, I have been looking at whole-house surge protection and currently have the fridge plugged into a new Tripp Lite Isobar4 Ultra 3330 Joules 135,000 Amps surge protector. So I think I'm covered in the short term.
 
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Dan O.

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If you have pets, probably at least quarterly if not monthly. Without, maybe every 6-months to a year. Check how much dirt accumulates after 6 and then adjust the timeline. Put it on your maintenance calendar. It doesn't hurt to do more often than necessary.


Dan
 

Ladd

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I just looked up "condenser" and realized that I have always called them "coils" without actually realizing that they were condenser coils. I have small-diameter horseshoe-shaped brush with the handle taped to a dowel that I've been using with a vacuum to clean the coils on our previous refrigerator once a year for many years.

I was surprised that the owner's manual said "if your condenser needs cleaning, call a service professional". Really?

Since there doesn't appear to be a vent cover down near the floor on the front of the KRFC704FSS03 refrigerator (as there was with the older Superba side-by-side), may I correctly assume that the condenser coils are accessed from the rear, probably by removing a metal or fiberboard access cover?
 
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Dan O.

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may I correctly assume that the condenser coils are accessed from the rear, probably by removing a metal or fiberboard access cover

I do not know how that specific model is designed. Removing the rear compressor cover may give access which is likely why they suggest calling for service. Some condensers can be very difficult to access.

Be sure to reinstall the cover as it is needed for proper air flow.

And the condenser is frequently referred to as the condenser coil although it's design is not always a 'coil'.


Dan O.
 

Ladd

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The Service Manual for the refrigerator has no mention of how to access the condenser. They do show a picture showing the condenser at the bottom of the refrigerator. It somewhat implies access from the back, but they show the compressor on the front and I'm quite sure the compressor is access from the back so I'm guessing placement on the picture does not indicate access.
 

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Dan O.

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Sometimes I'm sure the designers don't even consider service or maintenance. We've come across fridges where the easiest way to access the condenser was severely tilting the fridge and getting to it from underneath!

Someone would need to investigate the best way on yours. At least you don't have pets. :rolleyes:


Dan O.
 
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