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GE Refrigerator GSH25KGPAWW Overfilling Icemaker - Won't Turn Off Water

mlochala

Premium Member
Joined
May 26, 2009
Messages
6
Location
Amory, MS
Model Number
GSH25KGPAWW
Brand
GE
Age
More than 10 years
The icemaker is overfilling itself and flowing water all into the freezer and ultimately it runs out into the floor. When it does this, it dumps a LOT of water into my kitchen floor.

My refrigerator is approximately 18 years old. A couple of months ago I replaced the water fill valve (plastic double solenoid device) as it had a hairline crack and was leaking water. For about two weeks, there were no problems. Then, one morning we discovered water all over the kitchen and into the living room. The water was still running out of the refrigerator. We turned the water supply off and I suspected the new solenoid water fill valve was the culprit. I assumed it was faulty, so I replaced it again. Within five or six hours of replacing it, the water overfilling happened again. I have had problems in the past with little pieces of ice jamming the ice maker, but never this.

My question is, does the ice maker itself determine when to shut off the water or does this command come from the control board on the back of the refrigerator. At this point, I'm inclined to believe the ice maker is at fault, but I was curious if the water filling function is a timed event from the control board or if there is some mechanism inside the ice maker that tells it to stop filling the water.

Have any of you had this issue before? How did you repair it? Ice maker, control board, or ????
 

Dan O.

Appliance Tech
Staff member
Joined
Oct 9, 2004
Messages
5,423
Location
Ontario, Canada
mlochala said:
does the ice maker itself determine when to shut off the water

Yes.

At this point, I'm inclined to believe the ice maker is at fault

There is a way to tell for certain. If the icemaker was responsible for the filling there will be power at the water valve at that time. If water is getting past the valve even without power there, the problem is elsewhere. Just turning OFF the icemaker while leaving the water ON will usually help to pinpoint which is occurring.


Dan O.
 

Mark Lochala

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2019
Messages
7
Location
Mississippi
There is a way to tell for certain. If the icemaker was responsible for the filling there will be power at the water valve at that time. If water is getting past the valve even without power there, the problem is elsewhere. Just turning OFF the icemaker while leaving the water ON will usually help to pinpoint which is occurring.

I am fairly certain that is the case as I could hear the solenoid buzzing as the water was pouring out of the ice maker. It didn't occur to me to flip the switch off at the time.

So, does the ice maker have some sort of limit switch? And, if so, is it mechanical or electric? Can it be repaired or do you just have to replace the whole thing?
 

Dan O.

Appliance Tech
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Joined
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Messages
5,423
Location
Ontario, Canada
GE's electronic/mechanical icemakers sense the temperature change in the ice mold to determine when full. Other makes' icemakers fill for an exact length of time.

There are no replaceable parts in your icemaker. If malfunctioning the whole icemaker has to be replaced.

GE Icemaker Assembly

Dan O.
 

Mark Lochala

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2019
Messages
7
Location
Mississippi
There is a way to tell for certain. If the icemaker was responsible for the filling there will be power at the water valve at that time. If water is getting past the valve even without power there, the problem is elsewhere. Just turning OFF the icemaker while leaving the water ON will usually help to pinpoint which is occurring.
Well, apparently the ice maker isn't the issue. I played around with it last night and it would leak past and overfill even with the ice maker turned off. So, back to the drawing board...

I do recall reading somewhere that if your water pressure is less than 20 PSI the water fill solenoid valves will not close all the way and will leak past. I have noticed that the water flow has been lower than usual recently, and I've not seen less water pressure anywhere else in my home. Now, I'm wondering if there is an issue with the water filter.

Otherwise, another thought is, could it be some contacts are stuck on the ice maker?

Your thoughts?
 
Last edited:

Dan O.

Appliance Tech
Staff member
Joined
Oct 9, 2004
Messages
5,423
Location
Ontario, Canada
Poor water pressure to the fridge can allow a water valve to 'seep'. Check for a kinked water line which might be restricting water flow. Other than that, the water supply line connections are suspect.

Check for a partially clogged sediment screen where the water line connects to the fridge's water valve that might be reducing water flow.

On the other end, if a self-piercing saddle valve was used or any type of water valve valve is mounted on the under side of the house water pipe, that valve could have become clogged with lime and scale, etc. hampering water flow resulting in reduced water pressure.

water-valve-mounting-375x375-watermark-png.44459


Only a drill-type saddle valve should be used (if not a regular plumbing tap), not a 'self-piercing valve and only installed on the top of a horizontal pipe or side of a vertical pipe. If any kind of valve is mounted on the underside of a water line it should be relocated. Any 'self-piercing' saddle valve should also be replaced.

JMO

Dan O.
 

Dan O.

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Messages
5,423
Location
Ontario, Canada
Mark Lochala said:
Mine is mounted on the side

Was it a self-piercing or drill type valve? It makes a difference.

In any case, the water supply needs scrutiny. Is it connected to a water softener? Any inline water filters?

Dan O.
 

Mark Lochala

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2019
Messages
7
Location
Mississippi
Was it a self-piercing or drill type valve? It makes a difference.

In any case, the water supply needs scrutiny. Is it connected to a water softener? Any inline water filters?

Dan O.

Well, here's the latest....

I checked the water pressure. I have over 80PSI going to the fridge and still over 80PSI coming from the filter to the inlet valve. So, that rules out the water pressure and the filter.

When turning on the water, I'm still getting flow through directly into the ice maker. So, I next checked the voltage when this was happening. I'm not getting any voltage from the ice maker to the inlet valve, so there should not be any water flowing to the ice maker. Now, here's the weird part - when I had my son activate the drinking water function, not only did the water side of the inlet valve operate, but water began flowing from the ice maker side as well. Looking at the valve, I don't even know how this is possible.

So, at this point, I am beginning to believe that BOTH valves I have purchased are faulty. I'm wondering if this was just a bad batch of valves or if they are just cheaply and poorly made. They were from a local appliance parts house, and lower in price than their competition. Does this sound reasonable, or is there something I'm overlooking here?
 

Mark Lochala

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2019
Messages
7
Location
Mississippi
One thing I have just now noticed, the model number for these two valves is WR57X10051 and the one that is listed for my refrigerator is WR57X33326. They look identical, though, and the parts store said this was a suitable replacement. Now, I'm wondering...
 

Dan O.

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Messages
5,423
Location
Ontario, Canada
I don't know what the difference is between those valves but neither should work like that. WR57X33326 is the correct valve for that model.

LINK > Refrigerator Water Inlet Valve WR57X33326


Mark Lochala said:
when I had my son activate the drinking water function, not only did the water side of the inlet valve operate, but water began flowing from the ice maker side as well.

The valves should only allow water to flow when being powered. I don't know how power would get to the icemaker side of the water valve when the dispenser was activated. Check the wiring diagram if there is any wiring in common or at least confirm if power is really being applied to the icemaker side of the valve at that time.


Dan O.
 

Mark Lochala

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2019
Messages
7
Location
Mississippi
Well, I have been able to confirm that both new valves are indeed bad. I temporarily mounted them on my work table and connected a water source with variable pressure and a switchable 120V power source. On one valve (the last one installed), after a few cycles, the ice maker side ran continuously and would not stop the flow of water regardless of water pressure or power on/off. On the other valve, it actually ended up doing the opposite. Strangely, the ice maker side functioned properly and I could not get it to act up; however, the drinking water side had a very delayed reaction when switching it off and it would hold the water open for a few more long seconds and eventually it became stuck in the open position as well. I do know for a fact that this same valve did have the ice maker side stuck in the open position when it was installed in the refrigerator.

Another thing I noticed that was different between the two valves, the one in which the ice maker valve was stuck in the open position had a very high pressure stream of water to it. The one that seemed to be functioning properly, however, had a much lower flow rate. I would expect the proper function would have resulted in a lower pressure to the ice maker.

I videoed both valves malfunctioning so that I can show it to the seller when I return them. I am a little spooked about buying another one from them.

Thank you for your help!
 

Dan O.

Appliance Tech
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Joined
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Messages
5,423
Location
Ontario, Canada
Mark Lochala said:
the one had a very high pressure stream of water to it. [The other] had a much lower flow rate

I know clothes washer water valves have different flow rates. I wasn't aware refrigerator ones did but isn't surprising. You really don't want water shooting into the limited space of an icemaker mold or overfilling on time-fill icemaker designs. But that isn't usually a problem when you buy OEM parts and the specific one called for by model... which is what I suggest you get.

JMO

Dan O.
 
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