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Holiday brand freezer will run but wont freeze or cool

militarywifehoward

Premium Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2013
Messages
2
Location
north carolina
Model Number
Holiday
Brand
Age
6-10 years
My husband and i were just given a brand new deep freezer. Ive plugged it in and left it for several hours and its still not cold, let alone freezing. It is a holiday brand. When you plug it in, you hear the coolant moving inside the walls and the compressor runs. Ive tried different temps but its the same result. I havent tried taking it apart because im not sure where to start or what to do.
Any advice?
 

rickgburton

Appliance Tech - Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 11, 2006
Messages
38,701
Location
Murray, Utah 84107, United States
I'm not familiar with "holiday brand" but I can tell you this for a fact; If the compressor is running and the machine is not cooling, there's a sealed system problem. A sealed system problem can be anything from a refrigerant leak to an inefficient compressor. Sealed system repairs are expensive and often will exceed the machines value.
 

militarywifehoward

Premium Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2013
Messages
2
Location
north carolina
okay, so i did a little more research on the freezer itself and have found out that it came from lowes and they dont make them anymore :(
the serial number is BF0EV0E1B00BRC8M0228 model is LCM050LC
does this help you any?
 

rickgburton

Appliance Tech - Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 11, 2006
Messages
38,701
Location
Murray, Utah 84107, United States
Well, your freezer has a sealed system problem. Refrigeration systems in refrigerators, freezers, air conditioners, even commercial walk-in units all work the same way regardless of brand or model. All conventional refrigerators manufactured today, from the less expensive mini-refrigerator to the high end models, all use one basic refrigeration system that consists of a compressor, condenser, capillary tube and evaporator. The compressor is a pump, because the pump in a refrigeration system is always used to compress the refrigerant, it’s referred to as a compressor. When the refrigerator is turned on, it starts the compressor. Since the intake of the compressor is connected to the evaporator, it begins to pump out some of the refrigerant gas from the evaporator. As the refrigerant gas is removed the pressure in the evaporator begins to drop. If there is any refrigerant liquid in the evaporator it will immediately start to boil because of the lowered pressure, absorbing heat of vaporization in the process causing the evaporator to get cold. The cold evaporator will, in turn, absorb heat from warmer food in the refrigerator. The refrigerant pumped out of the evaporator is forced into the condenser tubing where it is compressed into a high pressure gas because of the restriction presented by the capillary tube prevents it from flowing through as rapidly as the pump can pump it out of the evaporator. As the compressor runs more and more, refrigerant is pumped into the condenser so that it becomes highly compressed and its pressure builds up. Compressing a gas concentrates its heat and raises its temperature. The hot refrigerant gas, at this point, contains the heat it started out with plus the heat it absorbed from the food compartment. The highly compressed gas can be quite hot. As the hot gas flows through the condenser coils it begins to cool, giving up some of its heat to the surrounding air. At this point the refrigerant contains less heat than when it entered the compressor even though its actual temperature is very much higher. At this lower temperature some of the gas condenses to a liquid and gives off the heat of vaporization which it absorbed when it boiled in the evaporator. By the time the refrigerant has traveled through the condenser all of it has become liquid and given off all the heat of vaporization it absorbed from the food compartment. After condensation, the liquid refrigerant continues to flow, first through the filter/drier where any contaminants like moisture are removed, through the capillary tubing into the evaporator where it boils again. This cycle continues as long as the compressor is running. In order for the refrigeration system to work properly, some restriction to the flow of refrigerant is placed at the entrance to the evaporator. This prevents the refrigerant from flowing too fast into the evaporator so it maintains a low pressure in the evaporator as the compressor pumps it out at the other end. At the same time the restriction causes the refrigerant to pile up in the condenser and capillary tube raising its temperature and pressure and permitting it to give off its heat of vaporization. The refrigerant from the outlet of the capillary to the inlet valve of the compressor is at low pressure. This is referred to as the low side. The refrigerant from the output of the compressor through the condenser and capillary tubing is at high pressure and called the high side. The capillary tubing offers the restriction necessary to separate the high side from the low side outside the compressor.
 
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