• Please note, some of the links on our site are affiliate links (Learn More)

Kenmore 417.44042400 spider repair story

valvashon

Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2020
Messages
1
Location
Seattle, WA
Model Number
417.44042400
Brand
Sears Kenmore
Age
More than 10 years
This is about the Kenmore 417.4042400 washing machine of the Electrolux design. The machine in question was built in 07/04.
IMG_0071.jpg

This machine is a nice size for our family, and we have a matching dryer that is scheduled to be stacked on top of the washer soon. For this reason I wanted to fix this machine, although I found out it was going to be expensive. For the past few years I have had to put new shocks in every year and have even put in a couple of pairs of springs. All in an effort to stop the shaking and bouncing that this machine was doing, getting worse until the shocks were completely worn out. This last time I had my son help me lift the tub up to attach the new springs.

The spider may have been cracked all along, or it may have been so weak that when my son lifted up on the tub itself (to lift the drum) he may have cracked the spider arm. Once we put it back together I noticed that it would not spin up enough to spin the water out in the final spin cycle. Opening the door I discovered that the washer basket was quite floppy. I knew that these machines had a problem with the spider arm but thought I had escaped it happening to me- I was wrong. They all do it so I am not blaming my son- unless it was weak it probably couldn't be broken.

The basket gasket was leaking as well, so pulling it apart wasn't going to be the worst thing that could happen. I followed one of the many videos on the appliance parts sites and discovered the spider looked like this:
IMG_7847.jpg


This machine had been together for 15 or so years, so I did have to use a puller to get the rear pulley off, and a reasonable amount of pounding with a hammer to get the spider/tub out of the drum. Once out I ordered a new one (almost $500!) even though this is a good portion of the cost of a brand new washer. I read elsewhere that spray painting the spider arm with epoxy spray paint was recommended to prevent corrosion. I wanted to do this so time was of the essence. Removing the bolts that held the spider to the new drum was challenging- it took a 10mm socket and a lot of muscle- these bolts are really put in there tight. Then some clever prying was required to pop the spider out of the tub as it's sort of held in there by the fold over crimp.
IMG_0033.jpg


Here is the new spider re-installed in the new tub. Don't forget to move over your inside agitator things! Clever prying was required to get the spider back in the tub also. When using the epoxy paint, be sure to follow the directions exactly- DO NOT recoat after the time specified. The paint will bubble and while you don't care how it looks, this means it has pulled away from the spider. I had to wait a week, sand off the bubbled up paint and re-paint. The idea was to stop corrosion, and hopefully my poor paint job will do this. Take your time and do a better paint job than I did. I suppose if you could get it powder coated like you do with car wheels that would be even better. I also pressure washed the mildew off of the tub and put in a new gasket (no leak anymore!). My rear bearing was good and the new spider went right into the back of the tub with a gentle push. When putting it back together, make sure you don't put the "bellows" thing at the bottom of the tub up too far- it needs to sit down on the lip at the bottom of the water exit and be held right there with the wire band. If you do push the bellows up too far it will cut off air flow up to the pressure switch and the machine won't stop filling (ask me how I know).

Inside of the machine there is a slight epoxy paint smell but it's not too bad. I'm hoping that will go away eventually. The first load I did was a machine wash with the "Glisten" washing machine soap. That took care of some of the paint smell and cleaned out anything that was left over from the repair and manufacturing process. Good news- the paint smell does not transfer to the clothes.



















That's a happy sound!

I will be pulling the old spider off of the old basket and tossing it in the recycling bin as we can do that with metal pieces around here. I will be using the old basket to make a hanging light fixture that will hang above the washer/dryer and will post pictures of that when I get it done!

Feel free to ask any questions-

Val
 
Top