• ** REMEMBER! **The microwave can still shock you even unplugged!!

    ALWAYS discharge the high-voltage capacitor first if you even think your hands will come close to any HIGH VOLTAGE components.

    Jeff mentions this: Anything in the high voltage ( magnetron, capacitor, diode, wires to and from ):
    ...Use a metal ( not the shiny chrome type ) screw driver with a insulated handle to short across ( touch both at the same time ) the terminals of the high voltage capacitor to discharge it.

    From Jeff's site: http://www.applianceaid.com/component-testing.php

    Jake

LG Microwave LMV1683ST - Stirrer Fan Cover Fire

dwzemens

Premium Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2014
Messages
4
Location
The Mitten State
Model Number
LMV1683
Brand
LG
Age
1-5 years
While heating leftover food for only a few minutes the stirrer fan cover in the top of the cooking cavity caught fire. Fortunately we were nearby and saw the flames and were able to extinguish them before anything burned except the plastic cover. I assumed the fire had started above the cover and popped the cover off to see what was above. What I found was just a recessed metal cavity with some perforated holes, no wires or other items that may have caused the fire.

So, I presume the fire started on the outside of the stirrer fan cover. I called LG and they "extended the warranty" as the unit is 18 months old. I am awaiting a service technician to check the unit.

Although the cover is destroyed, it *appears* as though the microwave itself probably can be repaired with a new cover, stirrer fan blade and a cleanup of the black soot inside the cooking chamber.

My question is: What starts such a fire? The oven was spotlessly clean. Also, should I be concerned about future fires if the technician deems the unit *repaired*.

Thanks for any advice.
 

jeff1

Appliance Tech - Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 10, 2004
Messages
23,935
Location
Ontario, Canada
Hi,

The oven was spotlessly clean
I saw you mentioned this...but more often we find something may have splattered and the food bits can heat up as well as what we have put in the microwave and carbons up and overheats...this is just one possibility but a common one in our area.

jeff.
 

dwzemens

Premium Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2014
Messages
4
Location
The Mitten State
Thanks Jeff. I noticed that was an issue in several Google articles I read about the potential cause. Trust me when I say it was spotlessly clean!

Can you offer any insight on my feeling that I cannot trust this microwave any longer? I am quite sure that the tech will be able to replace the stirrer cover and interior fan, and even though there's some smoke charring on the inside of the unit I think it probably will be deemed safe on inspection. Any reason why this fan cover is plastic instead of metal or some other material that is not combustible? It seems to be a common place for a fire. What are your thoughts?
 

jeff1

Appliance Tech - Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 10, 2004
Messages
23,935
Location
Ontario, Canada
Any reason why this fan cover is plastic instead of metal
Metal reflects the cooking energy.

It seems to be a common place for a fire
It is not overly. The most fires we see are accidents.....set the unit for 30 minutes instead of 30 seconds, set your coffee for 1 minute and check it at 45 seconds and it is fine you you remove the coffee and let the microwave finish those last few sections with nothing in it, etc, etc.

Can you offer any insight on my feeling that I cannot trust this microwave any longer?
Lightening doesn't strike twice...chances are something else might happen rather than the same thing.....not really what you wanted to hear right ;)

jeff.
 

dwzemens

Premium Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2014
Messages
4
Location
The Mitten State
Thanks Jeff. I assume that the microwaves enter the unit from the top of the cavity that is just above the stirrer cover? If so, then it makes perfect sense that the cover cannot be metal as the microwaves need to pass through and into the cooking chamber. Sound right?
 

dwzemens

Premium Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2014
Messages
4
Location
The Mitten State
One last question if you don't mind Jeff.

The stirrer blade in this particular microwave is not attached to any mechanical apparatus. In other words, the blade (which appears to be aluminum) simply sits above the stirrer cover in the top of the microwave roof. Most of my reading seems to indicate that the stirrer blade is mechanically driven and disperses the micro waves in much the same way a mechanical fan disperses air. How does the stirrer blade in this microwave perform any function at all if it's not mechanically or electrically driven?
 

jeff1

Appliance Tech - Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 10, 2004
Messages
23,935
Location
Ontario, Canada
ow does the stirrer blade in this microwave perform any function at all if it's not mechanically or electrically driven?
Air driven.

jeff.
 
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