Model 110.94832201 Bad Fuse Next To Thermal Fuse

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EasyGoing1

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Circuit breaker.
You're referring to the house circuit breaker? you give that PCB too much credit ... I guess I'm not surprised that the system works ... they do have some wide traces on that PCB for powering the motor, but it's not ... at least in my experience ... very common nor normal to have 120V AC with some amperage in it actually on a PCB ... these things are best done with wire only and relays mounted in external enclosures as they are under the hood of a car... I've posted my pics and the detail of what I found on a electronics forum and ive gotten some very good responses ... one person suggested putting a 100 watt light bulb in series with the motor and then plug it in to see if it will spin .. I thought of perhaps using a light switch dimmer turned all the way down, then applying power and slowly turning it up while watching an in series amp meter to see if the motor quickly begins to draw too much current....

Another person thought that maybe the solder joint on the relay was just weak and it couldn't handle a normal motor start condition which is a dead short for a few fractions of a second as is the case with any motor that you initially apply power to ... and if he's correct, then the solution to this problem will simply be some creative repair work on the board with my iron, solder, and extra copper that I have laying around to strengthen those PCB connections where 120 is being routed so that this never happens again.

What I wanted to say (but got side tracked) is that if there was ever enough juice running through those traces on the PCB on a level that would trip a house breaker ... I can guarantee you that the PCB traces would vanish off the board before that breaker would ever get tripped ... electricity seeks the path of least resistance and that circuit breaker is going to have a lot less resistance than those PCB traces will have.
 
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EasyGoing1

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Jun 11, 2019
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Victorville, CA
So as it turns out, a guy on the electronics forum posted a pic from a different washer that looked exactly like my pic did... he said that what happens in a poorly designed PCB, is that over time vibrations from the appliance will cause micro fractures in the solder joints which will cause arcing between the fractures. Eventually, the fractures get so big that the arc injects enough energy straight into the one solder joint causing it to blow out as this one did. The solution is to clean it up and re-solder it. I'm going to scrape away some of the coating on the actual PCB trace and take a small piece of bare copper wire and solder it to the PCB and the relay lead and do the same thing on all solder joints on the board that handle AC current so that this never happens again.

There is a class action law suit going against SEARS for a similar problem with some of their dishwashers I guess... but in that case there were actual fires being caused by the problem.
 

Jake

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I have seen this many times, this is nowhere near a class action, the control board has just wore out, replace the control board and you will be back in business for years to come.

As techs we don't do board level repairs, with 10 calls a days and 100 miles to go, we want to replace the board and get to our next call, clean and simple, no solder to mess with. 10 minutes and we are done. I can say I've replaced about 30 of these same control boards in the last 20 years and never had to go back to replace it a 2nd time.:)

If your a lawyer and want to file a class action, I got one for you here:

This thread is now closed!

Jake
 
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