Need Help...Maytag won’t cool...relay clicks

Galaxieman

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Apr 12, 2013
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Location
South Florida
Model
MSD2572VEW00
Brand
Maytag
Age
1-5 years
Model# MSD2572VEW00 (only 3 years old!)

Refrigerator stopped cooling. Relay on the compressor clicks and compressor turns on for about 8 seconds...turns off for about 1 minute then repeats this cycle endlessly. No cooling. The compressor sounds like it is running during the 8 seconds it is ‘on’.

I initially thought it was compressor overheating so I added a fan blowing on the compressor....no help.

Unplugged unit and let sit for a week. Plugged in and the same cycle repeats with a cool compressor.

Any suggestions would be appreciated,

Thanks....
 

Jake

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It may be the compressor start relay thats bad.

Follow the guide here to check and see if it rattles inside when you remove it: [FIXED] How to replace a (Whirlpool/Kenmore Model 106) Refrigerator Start Relay

Here's the compressor start device relay assembly for your model:
WPW10189190 Start Device Combination


Some models have this one as the compressor start device relay assembly:
Whirlpool WP2304884 Start-Dev


So I'd check to make sure which compressor start device relay assembly yours has on it if yours is bad before you order a new one.

Jake
 

Galaxieman

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UPDATE....

Jake, thank you for your input....

I have removed the start relay. There are two white wires and one red wire to the relay. On my Maytag there is a metal retaining clip that has to be removed before removing the start relay. The relay came off but I did have to pry slightly with a flat screwdriver.

The relay is numbered: W10197427 and it has a 'piggyback' capacitor which I assume is a start capacitor for the compressor motor. The capacitor value is 12uf 180vac.

The relay has NO shake or rattle.

I ran some more detailed tests to be more specific about my symptoms:

The relay/compressor system runs on a constant 148 second cycle that repeats endlessly. For the first 9.5 seconds after the relay initially clicks you can hear the compressor running; at the end of 9.5 seconds the relay 'releases' and the compressor stops. 9.5 seconds ON followed by about 139 seconds OFF. So, the relay seems to be working but something is deciding that 9.5 seconds is long enough and turns it off. After doing this for about 10 minutes the relay/capacitor was slightly warm and the compressor was also slightly warm.

BTW, can anyone point me to a schematic for my model?

Thanks again....
 

Jake

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Ok, The manufacturer has replaced part number W10197427 with this item, part number W10189190

You will need a multimeter to ohm test your compressor start relay.




Put your meter probes in the top 2 holes, and put your multimeter at the lowest ohms of resistance, it should read between 0-12 ohms. If you don't get a reading between 0-12 ohms, or you get no reading at all, then its bad.

If the compressor start relay tests good, that just leaves the compressor as the culprit.

Having a new compressor installed would cost about $400-$450.

But check your owners manual warranty first, some Maytag models have up to a 5 yr. warranty on the compressor for parts and labor.

Jake
 

Galaxieman

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"Put your meter probes in the top 2 holes, and put your multimeter at the lowest ohms of resistance, it should read between 0-8.7 ohms. If you don't get a reading between 0-8.7 ohms, or you get no reading at all, then its bad."

The reading is 8.3 ohms, so that would indicate that the start relay is good....

"If the compressor start relay tests good, that just leaves the compressor as the culprit."

How so? The compressor does run for 9.5 seconds. Some 'thing' is making a decision to turn off the compressor after 9.5 seconds. It could be because, as you say "the compressor is the culprit" or is it possible that the 'decision maker' is at fault? Is there some sort of pressure or temperature sensor that makes this decision to shut down the compressor? One of them could be bad? I would like to be very 'sure' before junking a 3 year old frig....

"But check your owners manual warranty first, some Maytag models have up to a 5 yr. warranty on the compressor for parts and labor."

One Year.....

Thanks for your help....
 

Jake

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Ok,

Lets confirm this, test for 120 volts at the compressor relay, if 120 volts is present for over 9.5 seconds, then you have a bad compressor.

You said above:
There are two white wires and one red wire to the relay.
Unplug your refrigerator first, then remove the compressor relay , then remove those wires from it and put your meter probes in each, then plug your refrigerator in and see if the volt meter reads 120 volts constant, leave the meter probes in those 2 wires for about 30-60 seconds, since you said the compressor only runs 9.5 seconds.

Now are the two white wires joined together or separate? I don't have the wiring diagram for this model so I can't see that myself.

That capacitor thats piggybacked is the run capacitor, not the start capacitor, The only purpose of the run capacitor is to improve compressor operating efficiency, it has nothing to do with keeping the compressor running itself.

Jake
 

Galaxieman

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I can answer part of your question tonight and the rest will have to wait until tomorrow....

"Now are the two white wires joined together or separate? I don't have the wiring diagram for this model so I can't see that myself."

The connector that plugs into the back of the relay has two connections. One pin is fed by the RED wire. The other pin is fed by both WHITE wires. I would guess that the RED is the hot 120 volt feed to the compressor and the White is the neutral, which is fed 'somewhere else' from the connector.

I will do the other test tomorrow....Thanks again....
 

Jake

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There you go, then volt test between the Red and both White wires for 120 volts.

Jake
 

Galaxieman

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Jake,

I connected a voltmeter directly into the back of the connecter that is pugged into the relay without removing the connector from the relay. So, everything is still connected but I am measuring the voltage entering the relay.

The cycle of the compressor remained the same. About 9 seconds ON followed by 140 seconds OFF. The voltage measured as follows:

9 seconds of 'ON': 110 volts at relay
140 seconds of 'OFF': 120 volts at relay

So, the compressor is actually trying to run (for 9 seconds) (I can hear it running for this period), indicated by the lower 110 volts, which is probably caused by heavy current drain. Once the compressor stops trying to run (for 140 seconds) the voltage returns to full 120 volts, indicating the compressor is not loading the circuit.
 

Jake

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Then that indicates your compressor is the culprit, the 110 volts when ON for 9 seconds is normal, now if it went to 90 volts or lower for ON for 9 seconds then that indicates a problem in your electrical breaker to that outlet your refrigerator is plugged into.

So seeing that the OFF for 140 seconds is still 120 volts, that means voltage is still present at the compressor start relay, which means you don't have any other issues except the compressor.

Its extremely rare to see Maytag compressors go bad in 3 yrs. So I'd go back to the store where you bought it at and ask to talk to the store manager to see if they will allow you a one time courtesy free repair to have the compressor replaced.

Jake
 

Galaxieman

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"So seeing that the OFF for 140 seconds is still 120 volts, that means voltage is still present at the compressor start relay, which means you don't have any other issues except the compressor."

Yes, I think I understand....there is something internal to the compressor unit itself that is making the decision that temperature or pressure is not correct after 9 seconds and then shutting down for 140 seconds before trying again?

Just for my own understanding (since we hear the relay clicking on and off at the same interval) I would like to know how the compressor 'communicates' to the start relay to deactivate after 9 seconds. Is that done through the third lead in the connection to the compressor?
 

Jake

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Ok Rick explains it here:

PTC RELAY WITH RUN CAPACITOR
When the compressor circuit is first energized the solid state relay has low resistance 3-12 ohms and both run and start windings are energized to start the compressor. The run capacitor is bypassed by the relay. When the self-heating solid state relay has reached temperature it will change from low resistance 3-12 ohms to high resistance 10k-20k ohms and switches off the start windings. The only purpose of the run capacitor is to improve compressor operating efficiency.
So like I said to test the compressor start relay is put your multimeter at the lowest ohms of resistance, it should read between 0-12 ohms

You said your reading is 8.3 ohms, so that would indicate that the start relay is good.

So lets check your compressor itself, There are three pins in a triangle configuration. The pin at the top is Common. The pin at left is usually Start. The pin to the right is usually Run. Read between C-S and C-R

Use an ohmmeter to check the C-S: Ohmmeter should indicate between 3 and 11 ohms. Then check the C-R: Ohmmeter should indicate between 1 and 5 ohms. Then check from each compressor pin to the compressor body for a short.

If your having a problem finding the START and RUN windings pins on your compressor Read what Jeff says here:

First check to see if you have windings in the compressor. Then check to see if they are grounded. If the compressor has windings and they are not grounded, you can find which winding is which. Check for grounded windings by reading from each terminal to a good ground on the cabinet. Read from the top terminal to the lower left terminal. Read from the top terminal to the lower right terminal. Read from the lower left terminal to the lower right terminal. Write down the resistance of each reading as you go. The highest reading you get will be the run and start winding of the compressor in series with each other. The other terminal left will be the common terminal. Read from the common terminal to each of the other terminals. The terminal with the lower resistance will be the run winding. The higher resistance the start winding.
NOTE: IF you measure across S-R, ignoring the common. That reading should be the exact total of the two individual coil readings, because you're reading through both coils in series now. If those two sets of readings aren't within about 1/2 ohm of each other, then one of the compressor windings is shorted, and if it runs at all, it'll run hot and usually end up short-cycling on its overload protector.

Jake
 

Galaxieman

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Jake,

I was able to make the resistance reading on the compressor pins. My triangular pin configuration is inverted from yours and Rick's description. My triangle has the single pin on the bottom with the other two pins on the top. My readings:

Between any single pin and chassis ground: open circuit (no shorts to ground)
Between the two pins on the top (S-R): 10.6 ohms
Between the single bottom pin and the left top: 4.1 ohms (lower reading = Run winding?)
Between the single bottom pin and the right top: 6.5 ohms (higher reading = Start winding?)

So, other than the fact that my triangle is inverted from your description, the readings seem to indicate normal winding resistances for the compressor windings....

PS:

Rick wrote: "When the self-heating solid state relay has reached temperature it will change from low resistance 3-12 ohms to high resistance 10k-20k ohms and switches off the start windings"

Would that occur after about 9.5 seconds? (9.5 seconds is how long my compressor seems to run out of the 147 second cycle it is stuck in.)
 
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Jake

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Would that occur after about 9.5 seconds? (9.5 seconds is how long my compressor seems to run out of the 147 second cycle it is stuck in.)
No, that would occur very quickly within a second or two.

Your compressor readings look fine, and your start relay readings look fine, so unless the piston in the compressor is just faulty it should be continuing to run after 9.5 seconds.

Or possibly the start relay is somehow shorting the circuit at 9.5 seconds, does the compressor get real hot just after the 9.5 seconds? You can put your hand on the top of the compressor and see.

Jake
 

Galaxieman

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....does the compressor get real hot just after the 9.5 seconds? You can put your hand on the top of the compressor and see.

Jake
After about 10 minutes of testing...it gets only slightly warm. You can touch it with no problem. When this refrigerator was 'in operation' and 'failing' (relay clicking as it is now...for over 24 hours) I measured the case temp of the compressor. It was about 120 degrees F and did not get any warmer than that.
 

Jake

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salsahead

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Hello, I have this model and it is exhibiting similar, but not identical, behavior, so I am not starting a new thread.

To my best ability, I have checked the start module ( 7.5 ohms), and the running capacitor (analog ohm meter bounces towards zero and then settles to infinite). There is no dirt, the compressor is not running hot, and there is no ice build up anywhere. The unit will attempt to start and when the compressor begins, it will operate, sometimes very briefly ( a few seconds), sometimes 30 seconds. Sometimes, however, it will stay on and run for a long time. Just opening the door, shaking the entire unit -- any disturbance will often cause it to try and cycle on. Since at times the compressor runs for long periods, I think that it may be OK. Any suggestions about what the problem might be? Temperature sensor, master control board?

Thanks,
Carl
 

Jake

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Hi Carl,

Its possibly the temperature control thermostat or defrost control board that's faulty.

Tap underneath the temperature control thermostat with the handle end of a flathead screwdriver to see if it comes on OR goes off by doing that.

Here's the parts diagram of both parts: Parts for Maytag MSD2572VEW00: Control Parts

#5 is your temperature control thermostat, #6 is your defrost control board.

Here's the temperature control thermostat for your model if you need to order it:
Whirlpool WP2315562 Thermostat


Jake
 

salsahead

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Thanks for your help.

It could be one of those. At the moment, it lies in wait as though it has forgotten its function. When I crack the door open, the light comes on and so does its brain, and it immediately starts to try to work. Much of the time, this means a short attempt, ranging from 30 seconds to a minute or so, with clicking when the attempt did not work. A day ago, I could press on the plastic covering surrounding the temperature controls and door light switch and that would initiate an attempt. I assume that this is the equivalent of tapping. When the compressor manages to stay on for longer than about 30 seconds, there is a momentary dip in frequency about every 5 seconds.

Just a moment ago, I lucked out and it has decided to put in a full morning of work.

--Carl
 

Jake

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That's very odd Carl,

From my experience when the temperature control thermostat goes bad it will not come on at all until you tap it in that area, then the compressor should stay running and not cut out every 5 seconds.

You might want to unplug your refrigerator first then ohm test the temperature control thermostat and your meter should read 0 ohms and stay constant at 0 ohms.

If not then its bad.

Jake
 
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