New owner of 1950 Frigidaire fridge

8ton

Premium Member
Joined
May 26, 2019
Messages
4
Location
Virginia
Hello all,
Last weekend I picked up a working 1950 MM 92 frigidaire from a older gentleman who was clearing out his mother's house.
I am planning on using in the kitchen of my wife and I's new home, a 1920's American foursquare.
I have had several project fridges in the past, but never had the means to get any working.
My plan is to replace the door gasket, better insulate the door (if it is open anyways) and respray the outside
w0ith appliance epoxy white. I will also clean the condenser coils. Long term I want to find the parts that I am missing from the lower crisper drawers.
ETA:also new cord. This one died as soon as we plugged it in....
I have a "kill-o-watt" meter that I will plug up to it once it is cold to settle a bet with a co-worker and monitor energy usage.
I found a site where I can purchase a download of the service manual, which I plan on doing, and a site that sells door gasket material. Are there any othe resources, tips, or tricks? Thanks guys!
 

Attachments

Dan O.

Appliance Tech
Staff member
Joined
Oct 9, 2004
Messages
1,790
Location
Canada
Good luck!

Long term I want to find the parts that I am missing from the lower crisper drawers.
Don't get your hopes up on finding such items unless you can find another whole refrigerator to purchase for parts.

My plan is to replace the door gasket
There used to be a universal door seal made specifically for older Frigidaire fridges, part # FR53 made by aftermarket companies Genline or Supco. I don't see it currently available anywhere but you might come across old stock somewhere. Otherwise you'll have to just use a general replacement door seal that is close.

and respray the outside with appliance epoxy white.
The model number is stamped in ink on the back of the cabinet. You might want to consider not painting over it in case it's needed in the future.


I'd be curious to hear the energy consumption but it is a small and simple manual defrost refrigerator. My guess is it won't use much power compared to frost-free refrigerators.

JMO

Dan O.
 

8ton

Premium Member
Joined
May 26, 2019
Messages
4
Location
Virginia
Thanks for the tip on the gasket.
I am going to mask off the back of the fridge before painting. There are a couple important paper stickers back there as well. You can't see the back when it is in place anyways!

I have tested the energy consumption of the two newer fridges I have, as soon as I get the cord on this one I will get it plugged in. I am going to get a reading with it empty with bad door gasket and again with new gasket. I will post in a week or two when I have real numbers.
 

Dan O.

Appliance Tech
Staff member
Joined
Oct 9, 2004
Messages
1,790
Location
Canada
Did you get this operational yet? How did the energy consumption test go?
 

8ton

Premium Member
Joined
May 26, 2019
Messages
4
Location
Virginia
Yes, the fridge has been running since the beginning of June. Refinishing the floors of our new house, painting and moving has consumed me, and am just getting a chance to catch up on extra stuff.
We installed a new cord and added a ground.
I installed the new door gasket yesterday. It took most of the day, but came out great. My joints at the corners are not perfect, but work and are a lot better than before. I ended up using J5-1 (p10338) universal gasket for a place called O-reps for around $2.25/foot after shipping.
I did not repaint the fridge re insulate the door or even clean the coils, as we still have so many higher priorities for the house. Also the door was heavily insulated as it was.
I had the electric monitor on it for a bit over a month, outdoors, with us using it for drinks and leftovers as we worked. Outside temps ranged from low 70s at night to mid 80s low 90s during the day. It was in direct sun. Inside temps ranged from 35-56 averaging mid 40s.
Electric consumption was calculated on a per year rate assuming a price of $ .125/kwh
The newer fridge dated 2005 , in same conditions, used $117/year. Our home fridge in typical use used $154, and this one used $54/year.
I will put the meter back on now it is inside and with a new gasket and will update in a month or two. Interior temps are much more consistent, only ranging 3-5 degrees in the mid 40s.
 

Dan O.

Appliance Tech
Staff member
Joined
Oct 9, 2004
Messages
1,790
Location
Canada
Thanks for the follow up.

Frost-free refrigerator models consume considerably more energy than manual defrost models do. I assume that is a big part of the other fridges' costs.

JFYI

Dan O.
 

8ton

Premium Member
Joined
May 26, 2019
Messages
4
Location
Virginia
Thanks Dan.
The frost/ moisture seems to be greatly reduced with the new gasket. However interior temp's are now low 30s in almost any setting I have tried. I am not sure if I understand the settings right.
The dial reads: off, defrost, C, B, A, 1-8. With bad gasket I had mid 40s on "4". After the replacement it is freezing the top 2 shelves. I tried 2, 1, A, B and C with several hours in between and am still in the low 30s. I am not sure what the letter's are supposed to be or if 1 is coldest or 8.
Thanks!
 

Dan O.

Appliance Tech
Staff member
Joined
Oct 9, 2004
Messages
1,790
Location
Canada
Yes, their markings are unique. C is the warmest, the higher the number the colder.

After adjusting the control you should wait 12-24 before measuring again. And measuring the temperature of a container of water on a middle shelf will give the best representation of 'food' temperature. Don't measure surface temperatures.

Dan O.
 
Top