Old Jenn-Air pushbutton fan switch - or motor?

Lex

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1970s Cooktop downdraft fan has not worked since I bought home. Decided I like this old cooktop and want to fix it up. Hunted everywhere for model #, but can't find. It is very early 4-burner electric cooktop. Above knobs, there is not the white skinny rocker/flip switch that I see in photos of similar old models. Instead, control panel has a more square white pushbutton on one side, and a red indicator light square on other side. Not sure if fan button is supposed to light up, but it is 3 wire, part number 707698, I believe.

Button switch now only available used, with corroded bezel and too much $$$. Option for replacement is cheap (and cheap looking) black plastic rocker switch.

Dumb questions:

Can I connect certain wires to bypass switch and see if fan runs?

And/or, how exactly could I test the switch - like with a multimeter?

If fan is good, could I fix the switch somehow? Or, is there a new pushbutton switch I could marry to the vintage externals?

I can solder and have multimeter, but I am an electronic/appliance idiot and need detailed instructions on testing, what wire color is what, etc. as I forget everything I learned on other projects, and don't know anything about appliances like this.

Thanks a million!
 

rickgburton

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The model number is usually located in the center duct where the filter goes. Or in the space where the jar goes. Take a few pics of the switch and wiring.
 

Lex

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portland
Thanks! How do I post pics? Will look in center when home, but now quite sure model is 2300ers, per online diagrams.

Wires are black, white, red, to white square button with chrome bezel, just like this one: ebay.com/itm/Jenn-Air-Cooktop-Push-In-Fan-Switch-/123652507251 Original control diagram for model shows part as 7698

For a while, Whirlpool sold an ugly plastic black rocker, Part Number 12001418 (AP4009405) as replacement for: 7-7698, 7-8285, 707698, 708285, Y707698, Y708285. Now can only get similar cheap rocker switch from 3rd parties.
 

rickgburton

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OK, let me see what I can find. To post a pic make sure the pics are on your computer. Click on the picture icon on the toolbar. Then navigate to your pics and select open then upload files.
 

Lex

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portland
Thanks so much!. No model number in duct, no jar on this as it has no grill option. Quite certain, now, it is 2300ERS. Thanks for photo posting info, doesn't show on mobile. Got to desktop and adding a few images I found online. I went ahead and ordered a new rocker switch, so that will tell me if the problem is with the switch or not. If so, I might try to see if I can marry the old and new, somehow, but it would look so much better if I could get a new pushbutton switch to fit under the original white square button, instead of the rocker. If it is not the switch, what would be the next (easiest) things to check? I stuck my hand through the duct and into the hamster wheel, and can turn it freely.
 

Lex

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Messages
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Location
portland
jenn2300ers.JPG

No cutout for "cartridge" of two burners or grill, as seems to have been more common - mine is just smooth around all four burners.
 

Lex

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portland
jennescutcheon.JPG jenn7698part.JPG

Found part diagrams, online, but not wiring, nor owners manual (though mine has label that I can mail 25 cents to get one).
 

rickgburton

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OK, it is a lighted switch. The white wire is the Neutral side of the light so if I remember correctly, the switch should close the connection between the black and red wire. There's a release tab next to each wire. Push in and the wire comes out. That style switch will come apart. The metal frame around the top of the switch has a tab on each side (might be just two sides) holding it to the switch body. Use a small flat blade screwdriver to pull the tabs away from the switch. You need to very careful here and not bend the tabs too far while you're holding the white button down. Keep holding the button down while you remove the frame. Here's the tricky part, release the pressure on the button very slowly or when you reach the "click" part in the switch, it will like explode and all the internal parts will fall out. You need to look how everything goes together. You'll probably need to clean the points.

Before you bypass the switch by connecting the red and black wires together, make sure one wire is going to L1 and one wire is going to the fan. Some of the older ranges used 220VAC indicator lights. I don't think that one is 220V but check to be safe. I don't have a wiring diagram either.

If all that sounds like too much, you can still find that switch if you do a search (key words: Jenn Air push button fan switch) but be prepared to pay over $100 for it. There's a few ways to workaround that switch. A 2 wire switch will work just tape off the white wire. If you're 30 miles from the shop on a service call and you don't want to make another 60 mile round trip to replace a switch, you get creative. Fortunately that's a large switch. Find a small square or round 2 wire switch. Match the voltage and amp rating on the old switch. I had a switch similar to this one
125V 4 Amp.jpg
I took the old switch apart and removed the guts. I drilled a hole the same size as the new switch in the white button part of the old switch and mounted the new switch to the white button. Drilled the same size hole in the bottom of the old switch. The hole needs to be big enough so the wire terminals of the new switch can poke through if necessary. Soldered 2 wires to the switch then fed them through hole. Used super glue to glue the white button and metal frame to the old switch body so the new switch is now inside the old switch and reinstalled the old switch. No light so tape off the white wire. It worked and didn't look bad. Customer was happy and saved having to make a 60 mile round trip when gas was $5 a gallon.
 
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