FIXED Removing clutch from old GE washer motor

FliesLikeABrick

Premium Member
Joined
May 27, 2018
Messages
4
Location
IL, USA
Model Number
NEED
Brand
GE
Age
More than 10 years
Hello forum,

I am attempting to reuse an induction motor from an older GE washer. I have successfully removed the top cap/cover, clutch housing (w/ included sheave and bearing), and a few other small components. Here is the assembly before any components were removed, as well as before pulling the clutch outer housing+bearing.


This revealed a collar or attachment that I am unfamiliar with, and cannot figure out the purpose or how to remove. This is shown in the other pictures below.


You can see the flat spot where a retaining clamp (U-bolt with flat steel bar that went into the flat spot, with 2 nuts on the u-bolt... not unlike an exhaust clamp on a car or other pipe) laid. The u-bolt laid in the semicircular groove around the collar. This little steel collar does not seem to be movable, and maybe is brazed or soldered in? I am not sure how it would be removed, as the ground-flat side seems to show that it is pretty thick, and may in fact be sitting in a reduced area of the shaft. Or is this brazed/soldered in place to join the actual motor shaft to an extension? I have no idea what purpose this serves, and welcome any input on the collar, its original purpose, and how it might be removed.

This is a motor I pulled from a washer that a neighbor was throwing out. I didn't grab the washer info, but the motor is (1725 rpm, probably 1/2hp or 3/4hp).

edit: I found
http://www.applianceaid.com/images/ge-osclutch.JPG

Based on this, the piece I'm picturing is the clamp/collar that is part of the base of the shaft extension, WH40X151. I am trying to figure out how to remove the shaft extension from the motor shaft itself
 
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FliesLikeABrick

Premium Member
Joined
May 27, 2018
Messages
4
Location
IL, USA
This is the exact assembly. I am not sure how to remove it. I am hesitant to use too much heat because a bearing is on the bottom part of this (and can't be removed with another assembly until this whole thing is off the motor shaft)

81s6c9MBvlL._SL1500_.jpg
 

rickgburton

Appliance Tech - Moderator
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Jul 11, 2006
Messages
35,237
Location
Murray, Utah 84107, United States
None of your pictures came through and the number on the motor is the motor manufacturers number, not the GE part #. If the motor is round it's probably a 1/2 hp. If it's square it's probably a 1/3 hp. You need two pair of channel locks. Go under the base plate and grab the motor shaft. The other pair, grab the shaft on the base plate. Spray the flat spot with WD40 and start working the base back and forth. When you see the flat spot on the motor shaft start to turn inside the base shaft, spray it again with WD40. Keep working it and it will come off.
 

FliesLikeABrick

Premium Member
Joined
May 27, 2018
Messages
4
Location
IL, USA
Thanks, I'm unable to go back and edit the original post any more -- here are the most important pictures missing from the original post. Indeed after cleaning this up with some brake clean, I see that the spatter I thought might be from brazing it on is actually just grease.

collar_front2.jpg

motor_side.jpg

It is indeed a square frame, so 1/3HP -- good to know, thanks.

I will try your technique out shortly.

edit: It is off! Thank you for your input, I was concerned that the shaft extension had a flat spot or key of its own. Your tip that it would turn inside the extension gave me the go-ahead I needed. With an aggressive pair of channel-locks (knipex cobras) on the motor shaft, and a pipe wrench on the extension - it came right off (dripping some penetrating oil in as it went)
 
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rickgburton

Appliance Tech - Moderator
Staff member
Joined
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Messages
35,237
Location
Murray, Utah 84107, United States
Awesome! That style was used for a long time. George Washington had a machine with that style...LOL. FYI: That style motor doesn't have a motor switch so you need the motor relay.
 

FliesLikeABrick

Premium Member
Joined
May 27, 2018
Messages
4
Location
IL, USA
Yep, I mapped out the motor windings a while back (for anyone who ends up here from Google: white-black is the start winding, yellow-blue for run) and picked up a generic relay that works sufficiently as a start relay (just wired it up to immediately disconnect the white-black start winding, which seems to be just slow (15ms per the datasheet) enough to help the motor start). I figured I may have other uses for that in the future even if it doesn't end up used long-term for a project with this motor. Its 1/2" connection for a normal electrical junction box is super convenient as well. 20A is overkill, but the 15A version was actually more expensive where I was ordering from.

My biggest issue now is that when I salvaged this motor, I didn't think to take the wiring harness/connector that goes with the motor. I don't suppose you know where I can get the machine-side (as opposed to motor-side) 5 pin/6 position connector for these motors? I have been scouring the Internet and coming up fruitless on even finding a part number for this connector.

IMG_20180505_185030.jpg

This is a shot of the motor side. I of course can cut and splice to these wires, but would really like to be able to properly attach to it if possible. Really kicking myself for not taking 30 seconds to assess what else I should have taken from the washer...
 
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