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SaniDry CX-109 Dehumidifier: Is This Normal?

linux4me

Premium Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2020
Messages
11
Location
Oregon
Model Number
CX-109
Brand
-brand-
Age
1-5 years
I noticed water seeping from under the cover of my 4-year-old SaniDry CX-109 dehumidifier. At first, I thought the condensation drain was plugged up, but I pulled the cover off and found that the source of the water was condensation on a small-diameter, uninsulated copper loop (indicated by the red arrow in the attached photo).

20200408_133756.jpg

The temperature in the crawlspace stays around 60 degrees, and the humidity is maintained by the SaniDry at about 60%.

What is that little loop? Is that condensation normal under those conditions, or is it an indication of a problem?
 

rickgburton

Appliance Tech - Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 11, 2006
Messages
44,285
Location
Murray, Utah 84107, United States
What is that little loop?
That's the capillary tube between the condensor and evaporator. The capillary tube carries warm liquid refrigerant to the evaporator and is married to the suction line to prevent frost from migrating back to the compressor. If the cap tube separates from the suction line, frost will start to migrate down the suction line. When the machine cycles off the frost melts and the water seeks the lowest spot to drip. Some moisture is probably normal however I don't know for sure. A dehumidifier is considered more of an HVAC unit. We use to have a good HVAC tech here but he died on us. I don't think anyone else here has any HVAC experience. Sorry about that.
 

Dan O.

Appliance Tech
Staff member
Joined
Oct 9, 2004
Messages
4,359
Location
Ontario, Canada
rickgburton said:
If the cap tube separates from the suction line, frost will start to migrate down the suction line.


Remove the black pipe insulation just above the loop in the pic and look at the tubing beneath it. As Rick said that smaller tubing should be soldered onto the side of a larger diameter tubing. If those two separate, frost will form on the tubing. You're likely seeing the remnance of melted frost dripping down from there.

Once you open it up let us know what's there and maybe post some pics.

BTW. Try to save the pipe insulation because it or a similar replacement will have to be put back on it. And don't knick the tubing beneath either.


Dan O.
 
Last edited:

linux4me

Premium Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2020
Messages
11
Location
Oregon
Thanks! I found that too, and this part was particularly interesting:
Frost visible on the cap tube is an abnormal condition (as there should be liquid refrigerant in the tube) and probably means low refrigerant and a leak or partial tube blockage
I also found this:
The technician should be very careful while brazing the capillary to the condenser and the evaporator coil. Since the diameter of the capillary is very small the capillary may get blocked if the brazing is done deep inside. Brazing the capillary requires lots of expertise and patience.
So, since I can't fix a leak, add refrigerant, and I'm not an expert at brazing, I'm thinking it's not worth my time to take the cover off again and investigate.

This unit has already had one repair while it was still under warranty, so I'm thinking that it might be replacement time. I'm going to call the company that installed it and see what they say.
 

linux4me

Premium Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2020
Messages
11
Location
Oregon
When this dehumidifier was dragged out of my crawlspace, it was leaking blue-tinted liquid, which I was told is a sign of a refrigerant leak, so it appears a refrigerant leak was responsible for the frost/condensation from the capillary tube.
 
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