FIXED Two Months After Clutch Replacement, Getting Soggy Spin Dry

kc27

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2006
Messages
57
Location
Milwaukee Wisconsin
Model Number
110.92588210
Brand
Sears Kenmore
Age
More than 10 years
My Kenmore 110.92588210 washer was purchased new in 1996. I replaced the basket drive and brake assembly and the clutch in December 2012. I replaced the motor coupling in July 2013. Two months ago I replaced the clutch because the spin dry was getting slower and slower, then finally quit spinning. Once replaced, the spin dry functionality was completely restored.

Now I am noticing clothes not being thoroughly spin dried again. Before I replace the clutch again, I was wondering if there is something else I should look into that might be causing the clutches to fail. Any ideas would be appreciated.
 

rickgburton

Appliance Tech - Moderator
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Messages
35,154
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Murray, Utah 84107, United States
kc27 said:
I replaced the motor coupling in July 2013.
New basket drive, new clutch, new brake, no doubt about it, the machine is being overloaded. The motor coupling is designed for that purpose, to save the motor and transmission . Could also be caused by a very slow pump not pumping all the water out before the machine goes into the spin cycle. Since it was the clutch last time, it will most likely be the same thing. Overloading wears the clutch bands out. When they slip they get hot. When they get hot they slip more.
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Clutch-285785-01200107.jpg
 

kc27

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2006
Messages
57
Location
Milwaukee Wisconsin
Thanks for the response. My spouse and I load laundry to the top row of drain holes in the basket with no pushing down of the load to accommodate more clothing. Hopefully that is not considered overloading. In the past couple of years, my two kids have started doing their own laundry, I will have to see if how much they are putting into the washer.

I can replace the clutch again. But if this happens again, assuming no overloading, is that then an indication that it is time to start shopping for a new washer? The companion dryer (also 19 years old) works fine, so I would not replace it, just the washer. Whenever it's time to move on to another washer, I had planned to get a Speed Queen top loader.
 

rickgburton

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I can replace the clutch again. But if this happens again, assuming no overloading,...... I had planned to get a Speed Queen top loader.
The only thing that wears out a clutch prematurely is overloading. SQ is owned by Alliance. They're more known for commerical laundry equipment.
 

kc27

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2006
Messages
57
Location
Milwaukee Wisconsin
As I was replacing the clutch, I compared the 2 month old clutch to the new one. Just based on appearance, the 2-month old clutch that was failing did not look that much different than the new clutch. Something must have been amiss, however, because the washer spin dries much better now with the new clutch. Thanks for the advice.
 

rickgburton

Appliance Tech - Moderator
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Messages
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the 2-month old clutch that was failing did not look that much different than the new clutch.
The clutch lining has three pads that are designed to slip inside the clutch hub. The white plastic piece on the bottom of the spin tube is the cam driver. When the machine goes into spin the cam driver comes around and pushes the tab on the clutch spring and the clutch lining slips in the hub until the lining and hub are turning at the same speed. The friction from the lining pads against the hub create heat. When the tub is overloaded the extra weight causes the lining to slip more and it takes longer before the lining and hub are turning at the same speed. The more it slips the more heat it generates between the pads and the hub. When it gets too hot the surface of the pads become smooth and shiny and starts losing it's ability to grab the hub and it keeps slipping resulting in slower spin speeds.
 

kc27

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2006
Messages
57
Location
Milwaukee Wisconsin
I understand avoiding overloading the washer is the key to preventing this problem. Would a clutch with six pads instead of three be of any benefit? I saw this Whirlpool part, #3953062. Assuming this part would fit my washer, would it make any difference in washer performance and clutch longevity that I could notice?
 

rickgburton

Appliance Tech - Moderator
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Messages
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kc27 said:
Would a clutch with six pads instead of three be of any benefit?
Good question. Right off hand I would say 6 is better than 3 but I don't know for sure if it it would last longer or stand up to overloading. In the appliance repair world you always want the best part for the least amount of money. I carry and use the one with three pads for all my clutch replacements. I don't have any problems and I haven't had to replace one for wearing out prematurely so it wouldn't make any sense for me to pay twice as much for the part for the same results. If you have a large family with four or five people using the machine and you can't control who is overloading and who is not, one with six pads might be a better way to go. It's just a guess whether it would last longer.
 
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