• ** REMEMBER! **The microwave can still shock you even unplugged!!

    ALWAYS discharge the high-voltage capacitor first if you even think your hands will come close to any HIGH VOLTAGE components.

    Jeff mentions this: Anything in the high voltage ( magnetron, capacitor, diode, wires to and from ):
    ...Use a metal ( not the shiny chrome type ) screw driver with a insulated handle to short across ( touch both at the same time ) the terminals of the high voltage capacitor to discharge it.

    From Jeff's site: http://www.applianceaid.com/component-testing.php

    Jake

Underpowered new microwave?

al58

Premium Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2011
Messages
2
Location
Montréal, QC
Model Number
NN-GD568S
Brand
Panasonic
Age
Less than 1 year
Hi all,
So I just bought myself a new Panasonic microwave oven, model NN-GD568S, inverter type, 1100W, with grill.

I was curious to check the effective output power of this oven, so I used this procedure:
– 500 ml of tap water in a plastic bowl.
– Agitate water for 10 seconds and measure temperature.
– Heat at 100% for 2 minutes.
– Agitate and measure temp.
– Calculate the wattage based on this equation: (end tºC – start tºC) x 4.2 x vol in ml ÷ time in seconds = wattage

I ran this test several times, and I consistently get a result around 780W. What gives?
I know that this test is not really accurate but still, I expected a higher figure.

I ran the same test on my old MW, an 800W Samsung from 1994*, and I get 596W, which seems reasonable for an oven that age. So it looks like although my new MW is rated 300W higher than my old one, I only get around 180W additional power with the Panasonic.

My question is, do manufacturers lie about the rating of their microwaves? But my real concern is, could it be that there is an important amount of radiation leak in my Panasonic that causes the low results?

Or am I worrying for nothing and should I just be happy with my purchase?

TIA for any insight.

-----
* Why do I have 2 MW's? Because I thought my old Samsung was fried, as it made a loud buzzing sound when on, but after buying a new oven in panic and before throwing the Samsung to the trash, I managed to figure that it was just the fan motor that had seized up, and I was able to take it apart and clean and lubricate it, and now it works like new.
 

jeff1

Appliance Tech - Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 10, 2004
Messages
24,008
Location
Ontario, Canada

al58

Premium Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2011
Messages
2
Location
Montréal, QC
OK, I followed the procedure given in the link, and the figures are more like it.
I guess my previous calculations, although sound in theory, didn't account for things like thermal loss due to evaporation.
Thanks Jeff for putting my mind at ease. :)
 
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