Vintage Coldspot Fridge - 1950's era I believe

sven_one

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I'm looking for information on a 1950's (I believe) Coldspot refrigerator. The fridge stopped staying cold a couple of years ago. Prior to that it was ice cold, so I don't believe it has any leaks. The compressor briefly turns on and then turns off and remains off. My dad mentioned that the compressor isn't pumping. The fridge has sentimental value to my dad and the family, as it was a wedding gift to my grandparents so I'd like to resurrect it if possible.

I'm trying to find out what compressor I would need to retrofit with a new unit. The model number appears to be 106.G9B1-C and S/N R371235. I would like to know how to decipher the model number to determine the actual age and compressor size. Can anyone with knowledge of old refrigerators help me out?

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rickgburton

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It may be as old as 1947 but I'll need to check with Jake first. There is no compressor information in the model number. All the compressor information will be on the compressor. It's most likely a 1/4 hp or 1/4+ hp, 800 BTU's. The problem may not be the compressor. During the 50's and 60's many compressors used a "Hot Wire" relay and overload that would fail before the compressors. If you can take some pictures of the sealed system, like the compressor and condensor coils. See if there are numbers or tags on the compressor. There are different styles of relays and they're usually mounted next to the compressor. It's what the compressor wires connect to. If you can take some pictures and post them here I'll see what I can do. If the compressor is bad finding a replacement is the easy part. R-12 is no longer available and it doesn't mix with R-134a. The only way around it is you'll need to use a drop in replacement. No big deal for a tech that knows what he's doing. The hard part will be finding him.
 

Jake

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I wish I could help with the age, but I can't as I didn't run across many vintage appliances this old before.

But I believe Rick is in the ballpark of saying 1947 or earlier.

Jake
 

Jake

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Ok, sounds good.

Jake
 

sven_one

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I was able to get the fridge pulled out to get some pics of the compressor and relay which you can see below. While I had it pulled out, I was able to get the compressor to keep running by bypassing the relay using a procedure I found on another post. I was excited to get the compressor running, but after 10-15 minutes I didn't feel any of the refrigeration lines getting cold. Is it possible that it will just take more time since it has sat without running for several years? Based on the pictures can you recommend a replacement unit?

One other thing I noticed was that the wiring was all pretty crispy and the insulation was falling off easily. The wiring going to the compressor is still quite soft and didn't crack. The wiring going into the case is my biggest concern since I can't easily replace it. Is it easy to replace the existing wiring by using it as a fishing line to pull new wiring into the case?

If I can easily replace the internal wiring, and locate a replacement compressor, I think the unit can be resurrected. Any thoughts/advice or advice based on this new information?

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rickgburton

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sven_one said:
If I can easily replace the internal wiring, and locate a replacement compressor, I think the unit can be resurrected
Ten minutes is not long enough. Unfortunately I can't read the tags. Read my post #2 again. I'm not sure you understand what you're up against. Is sentimental value worth $1000 or more? That's what it would cost to do what you want to do. A good refrigeration tech can size the compressor for you.
 

sven_one

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I do understand what I'm up against, and I am assuming the compressor is good and doesn't need to be replaced. Based on all of the research I've done since the original post, I think the original hot wire relay failed. My guess is that if I replace the old relay with a new 3 in 1 relay and let it run for an extended time I will see cooling.

I removed the door switch and light receptacle to inspect the internal wiring. The internal wiring is still soft and pliable. Based on that, I don't need to re-wire the fridge internally, which is a pleasant surprise.

I have an RCO810 3 in 1 relay and new power cord to install to see if a longer run of the compressor will cool the fridge. Based on some other posts with wiring diagrams for old fridges I have created my own wiring diagram. Can you look the wiring diagram over and tell me whether I have it laid out correctly? FYI... I plan to use a 5 position terminal block for all of my connections, which is what you see in the bottom left of the diagram.

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slbrown

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I wanted to see if you refurbished this refrigerator? My dad has one exactly like it and needs to replace the freezer door. His got damaged while defrosting. It has been running for over 60 years and has never been serviced. Works as good as the day he got it. Just need a new freezer door.
 

rickgburton

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That's going to be a hard part to find. If it's the plastic door you can probably manufacturer one.
 

RAWest69

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I have the same refrigerator. How do i wire the 3 in 1 relay on the compressor. How do I know which terminal is the Run, Start and Common on the compressor?
 

rickgburton

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Measure the resistance of the compressor windings. We'll call the three comp terminals A, B, and C. Measure A-B, A-C and B-C. The highest ohm measurement is the combination of the run and start windings so the terminal your test lead is not on is the common terminal. Then measure from the common terminal to the two other terminals. The lowest reading is the run windings.
 

Webbie1

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I'm picking up this same model for a 50's kitchen project that I'm doing. It appears to be in nice condition, but as I'm picking it up tonight I really can't say for sure until I have it. I'm following this thread to see if there are ever any updates. These things look SO good. Here's the one I'm picking up tonight.

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Webbie1

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Got it home. Well, it's out on my truck until I get help unloading it, but it's home. When I picked it up, the fridge was nice and cold and there was ice forming in the freezer box. Seems to work well. Seems super clean inside and man is it gorgeous inside.

Warner.
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Webbie1

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Well, it survived the move. I left it stand for 24 hours after moving it into my house, and plugged it in. Here are the fridge and freezer temps this morning. I am guessing the dial above the freezer section is for the freezer temp - it seems to click most of the way around, then it spins freely for a bit, then it clicks again. Anyway, here are the readings this morning. It looks like I could bump UP the temp in the fridge a bit, and get the freezer temp down to zero degrees. I think that's feasible once I figure out how that dial above the freezer actually gets adjusted. I unplugged it this morning though because I'm not nearly ready for it in my kitchen, which I'm remodeling retro 50's.

Warner

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