FIXED Water build up inside refrigerator (model 106.70277990)

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JLC

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If you are experiencing the ice buildup problem here is my suggestion:

This was on a Kenmore bottom freezer, approx. 2 years old.

1. Empty the freezer and unplug the fridge.
2. Leave the freezer door open to defrost (for reference, mine took about 8 hours)
3. You can take the inside of the freezer appart as described in earlier posts, but I'll warn you it's not easy so if that intimidates you skip that. This is what you'll see if you do. The the bottom center of the coils there is a drain.
Inside front.JPG
frozen drain.JPG

4. Pull the fridge out from the wall and remove the back cover at the bottom, this is what you'll see.
Inside back.JPG
5. On the bottom of that drain will be a rubber fitting with a slot in the bottom.
nozzel.JPG
If your's is anything like mine, it was full of grease and crud and completly plugged.
7. Clean that rubber fitting and reinstall it. I cut the slot bigger in mine and reinstalled it, you may consider just leaving it off.
8. Now leave the fridge unplugged and the freezer door open until it's completly defrosted. I would suggest overnight. I think the food in the fridge should be okay, and if you don't want to take the inside of the freezer appart to clear the drain with hot water and a hair dryer, defrosting overnight is your only option.
9. Check that evaporation pan now that the freezer is defrosted, it was probably empty when you first took the back cover off, and it should have lots of water in it now. I would empty it by soaking it up with paper towels.
10. Reinstall the back cover.
11. You're done, plug the fridge back in and enjoy!

I hope this helps someone out there!
 

showhost

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Hey JLC....

Thanks for adding your insights. Can you clarify -- if you look 8 posts back at the two photos I posted, id that what your unit looks like. Can't figure from your description how you accessed the "bottom of your drain" that you refer to. If you look at my pics you'll see that the drain hole is just a hole at the bottom of the freezer. Where is this part you're showing and how did you get to it? Not sure how you say the drain is only 3 inches long when the drain starts in the freezer at the top of the fridge and the pan is at the very bottom of the fridge under the main food section.
 

showhost

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Okay... you posted another post as I was posting mine. Yours is a bottom frezzer. Not sure we have the same plumbing in our units or where to find that fitting on mine.
 

JLC

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Pull the cover off the back at the bottom, the end of your drain should go down to the evaporator tray at the bottom. Your drain might have a plugged up rubber fitting like mine did?
 

showhost

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Does this "fitting" just stick on the end of the drain tube and hover above the pan? In your pic, the arrow points to what looks like a white tube going into a black wrench-shaped thing. Yet the fitting you show is a skinny black thing (not white) and looks nothing like the black wrench-shaped thing.
 

rickgburton

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Thanks for the information. What model refrigerator do you have? Most refrigerators don't have any sort of trap like that. Many just use a molded hose with a small goose neck in it.
 

JLC

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Yes, you're correct.

The black rubber part slides over the small white drain. (it's not on tube in the pic) The water drips out of the rubber and onto that black part and then runs down to the pan.
 

billybgame

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I'm back here, yet again. Think the good working fridge lasted 3 or 4 months, this time. I am pretty damned tired of it, so just started collecting water in it, with a tupperware type container, then emptying that, occasionally. Seemed better than going through this process twice a year! I have been just living with it like this, for months now.

I had put that piece of copper down the drain, last time, so that did not work, evidently. I still don't get this. This has got to be a complete lemon of a fridge. I have NEVER seen this before in any fridge. But, I digress.

At times, my motor or fan, or whatever runs in the freezer, has started to get loud. I've seen the venting getting clogged with ice....so tried to break that up....seemed to alleviate it. Did it again, recently. Now, my fridge food was suddenly not very cold, this AM. And, where the water collector in the back of the fridge was usually a block of ice, it is now just water in the container. Freezer still plenty cold. Insights?

Guess I'll be taking it all apart again. Thinking about putting it by the side of the road, to be honest. Not my idea of a fridge anyone should have to deal with.

Edit: BTW, I'm noticing this thread is for a different model # than mine. Can't recall if this matters, or not. I believe mine is 79202990. Close, but not the same.
 
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billybgame

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Don't see a way to edit my last post, so here I post again.....

Got my line clear, as usual. But, just like last time, once clear, I can put many 60 cc syringes of water in there, and all it does is drip a few times, at the bottom. The pan is filling with water, though. So, I guess it works. But, I'm rushing back, behind, hoping to see a stream, but it's just a slow drip. Doesn't seem right. Water isn't backing up, up top, though.......

Want to get it back together, naturally, so here we go again.
 

rickgburton

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When I clean a drain tube I use a turkey baster with very hot water and it doesn't drip so it sounds like there might be something caught in it. Is there any water dripping into the FF section?
 

billybgame

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When I clean a drain tube I use a turkey baster with very hot water and it doesn't drip so it sounds like there might be something caught in it. Is there any water dripping into the FF section?
Not currently....that's my first indication of problems, down the road, though. I know....I looked on the floor, in the fridge, around the drain pan, so not sure where the water was going. Although, like I said, the pan was bone dry, and had a good amount of water in it, so maybe it's getting there, and I'm not judging it properly, or getting back there quick enough. I'm pretty fast, though.

If I still have it, maybe I'll wait until I have a partner, to observe. I'm definitely going to try and get rid of this albatross. It's all back together, now.

Edit: Yeah, I had piping hot water, and used this big syringe I have. Be about the same as a baster, I'm sure. And, like last time, it wasn't working, until I stuck my screw driver down the drain, and could feel blockage. Gave a few jabs, and it cleared, and water started draining. Looked in back, and water was coming through, along with some ice. Maybe there's just more ice, down lower? Or, some sort of blockage? Could be the crux of my problem, I guess. Just like last time, after that initial, faster water, it just drips, thereafter.
 
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profgolf

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Nov 11, 2014
Messages
1
Location
winnipeg
If you are experiencing the ice buildup problem here is my suggestion:

This was on a Kenmore bottom freezer, approx. 2 years old.

1. Empty the freezer and unplug the fridge.
2. Leave the freezer door open to defrost (for reference, mine took about 8 hours)
3. You can take the inside of the freezer appart as described in earlier posts, but I'll warn you it's not easy so if that intimidates you skip that. This is what you'll see if you do. The the bottom center of the coils there is a drain.
View attachment 11345
View attachment 11346

4. Pull the fridge out from the wall and remove the back cover at the bottom, this is what you'll see.
View attachment 11343
5. On the bottom of that drain will be a rubber fitting with a slot in the bottom.
View attachment 11344
If your's is anything like mine, it was full of grease and crud and completly plugged.
7. Clean that rubber fitting and reinstall it. I cut the slot bigger in mine and reinstalled it, you may consider just leaving it off.
8. Now leave the fridge unplugged and the freezer door open until it's completly defrosted. I would suggest overnight. I think the food in the fridge should be okay, and if you don't want to take the inside of the freezer appart to clear the drain with hot water and a hair dryer, defrosting overnight is your only option.
9. Check that evaporation pan now that the freezer is defrosted, it was probably empty when you first took the back cover off, and it should have lots of water in it now. I would empty it by soaking it up with paper towels.
10. Reinstall the back cover.
11. You're done, plug the fridge back in and enjoy!

I hope this helps someone out there!
This helps a lot.
How did you get the drawers out of the freezer?
Tom
 

Farse

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Oct 26, 2017
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MARYLAND
The problem of condensate water draining from the evaporator pan into the refrigerator or onto the floor instead of down into the drain pan, where it belongs, is common to Whirlpool and Kenmore (made by Whirlpool) top and bottom mount freezers. There has been some confusion because the remedies offered generally ignore the fact that the problem has three different causes with different solutions

One cause, common to both top and bottom freezer models is ice in the evaporator drain tray and the top of the drain tube. The usual proposed solution is to remove the back wall of the freezer and melt the ice with hot water. The alternative and much simpler solution, if you can empty the freezer and refrigerator, is to pull the plug until the ice melts. Twelve to fifteen hours at normal room temperature should be sufficient. If this doesn’t work, the drain tube is likely blocked and the cause and solution depends on whether you have a top or bottom mount freezer.

If the blockage occurs in a bottom mount freezer, it will almost certainly be due to a rubber “duck bill” check value at the bottom end of the drain tube—the fitting is round on the input with a slit on the output. The rubber ages and becomes sticky and causes a blockage. The cure is to replace the fitting with a new plastic trap that is available from Whirlpool or from Sears’ Parts Direct. It will be best if you provide the model number of your refrigerator. Instructions come with the replacement trap and there is a U-tube video of the job Drain Pipe W10619951

If the blockage occurs in a top mount freezer, the solution may depend on whether the back panel of your refrigerator is removable. I noticed in the store today that the backs on current models are removable, but on my vintage 1995 model the back panel (not the bottom access panel) is spot welded in place making it impossible to access the drain tube itself. In this case, the only solution is to blow through the tube to try to dislodge the blockage. Based on my model, I don’t think blowing from the top is feasible because overflow from the drain system occurs below the drain tray indicating the system is not tight. The bottom end of my drain tube is a half inch diameter metal tube over the drain try under the refrigerator. Using a half inch ID hose fitted over the tube, I blew from the bottom using my breath and it cleared the blockage. However, some black gunk came through the vent at the top of the refrigerator compartment onto the top shelf. If it blocks again, I’ll attach a half inch hose to my shop vac and try vacuuming it out. (Thanks to the Sears expert that suggested this approach at shopyourway.com/questions/1188446.)

Because of the apparent need for a check valve or trap in the bottom freezer, I’m going to speculate that the drain tube in the top freezer has a trap somewhere in its three foot length—probably near the top—and that is where the gunk grows that eventually creates a blockage. It seems likely that this could happen in the replacement trap for bottom freezer models and at shorter intervals because of the warmer environment in the compressor compartment. But there, removal of the trap for cleaning should be feasible. Just keep the installation directions.
 

rickgburton

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Farse, this is a pretty old thread. There's quite a few threads on the subject. Here's the models that use the duckbill in case you need it:
 

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Farse

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Farse, this is a pretty old thread. There's quite a few threads on the subject. Here's the models that use the duckbill in case you need it:
There are a gazillion threads. However, in all my searching, I didn't find any explanation of the differences. Most address ice, some address the duckbill (viz your response) and only one or two addressed the top freezer tube blockage--perhaps because the top freezer drain is inaccessible in the models with non-removable back panels. One source said a blocked drain tube on a top freezer was not repairable. Sears sold me a trap to replace the duckbill although the model number I provided was for a top freezer. After several hours of searching online over several days I found the "blow it out" solution on the day we were shopping for a new refrigerator. I expect to get several more years out of the box we have and like. I just wanted to spare someone else the time I spent looking at irrelevant solutions and this seemed to be the best place to put it. If there's a better place, please move it there.
 
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