What to do as a Tune up before installing a used Bosch dishwasher, SHE6AF02UC/06

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Apr 10, 2017
Messages
38
Location
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Model Number
SHE6AF02UC
Brand
Bosch
Age
6-10 years
I picked up a used Bosch dishwasher, model SHE6AF02UC/06 with FD91xxxxx. Adding 20 to the the FD number indicates it was built in 2011. I don't know the history of the DW other than it was used in an office kitchen, not a residential kitchen. In fact the seller (who recently bought the office building) didn't know if the DW worked or not.

The DW didn't seem to have any issues completing a 'quick wash' cycle and a 'power scrub' cycle while hooked up outside to a cold water line (garden hose) on the back deck at home. No leaks, and no indication of previous leaks.

I found the tech sheet for it underneath the dishwasher. The paper instruction sheet was scrolled up and tucked on the backside of a 'pillar'.

Using the tech sheet I put the DW into 'Customer Service Program' mode by turning the DW off with the power button, then pressing and holding any two buttons, then pressing the power button to turn it back on, then releasing the two held buttons.

After starting the program, I let it run and complete, which took maybe 20 minutes. I didn't pause the program to measure water levels or water temperatures. There were no error codes after program finished. The DW similarly displayed E00 (no errors) as I toggled backwards through the error status of the previous 8 wash cycles.

I looked though the online explode-view drawings for internal filters or screens I might clean as part of a 'tune up'. I didn't see any. There are some sensors, but I hesitate fiddling to clean them due to risk of damaging the sensor surface.

What ought I do to tune up the DW before installing it?
 
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Ok, I put the DW on its back, then removed drain pump, which was super easy.

This is the pump I'm talking about:
00611332 Drain Pump


Bosch part numbers 00611332, 1557816, 611332, AH3477702, EA3477702, PS3477702, PS8727352, B01LZV53G5

And the video there shows how to remove/replace the pump.

There was an 1/8" thick shard of clear glass, about 1/2" by 1/4", in the 'socket' to which the drain pump inserts. It was sharp, and would have been very close to the impeller, but the impeller wasn't dinged or damaged.

Found a second shard in the the the inner 'cup' of the Filter Basket:
00645038 Filter Basket


Bosch part numbers 00645038, 1560725, 645038, AH3479708, EA3479708, PS3479708, PS8730270, B0034J8EO8

I suppose I ought to do more disassembly to look for other shards. Any suggestions? Where else might I find other glass shards?
 
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Ok, I disassembled the guts. Didn't find any howto videos for this model. Just winged it. Gotta be the easiest machine I've ever worked on. Took off circulation pump, drain pump (again), something that looked like a sensor, and a couple hoses. Had visual access to all the water chambers. This didn't require taking off the door, nor detaching the base from the cabinet. Those two steps must be for Bosch's other, different models/designs.

Taking off the circulation pump required removing a ~1/4" crimp-style hose clamp. On reassembly, I used a 27-51mm 1/2" hose clamp of the common screw design.

Didn't find any more glass shards. Just the two mentioned above. No other debris and almost no gunk or build-up. I saw the flapper that acts as a check valve. It was clean and flexible. The drain and circulation impellers turned freely. I took off the spray arms and shook them to check for glass shards inside (as another poster had found). None.

I didn't disassemble the circulation pump unit. I shook it, though. No rattles. I didn't dissemble it because it required releasing about 6 pry tabs that were very stiff. Didn't want to break that and have to buy a $200 part.

It would have been nice to know the composition of 4 or 5 O-rings and seals in order to clean and lubricate them for re-assembly. I didn't.

Dishwasher is now back together and running a regular wash cycle. After that completes, I'll check for leaks, then run the diagnostic Customer Service Program again and pause it to measure water depth and water temperatures as spec'd on the tech-sheet.
 
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Ok, the 2011 DW under the counter now, running a first load.

Our current on-the-fritz 2003 DW came with the house. It had been installed using bendable copper tubing. The compression connection at the DW was sealed with a copper/brass ferrule. The (new) 2011 DW still had a braided stainless steel hose attached, which sealed with rubber washers. Are the two methods of sealing compatible? I search around to see if the two types of line could use the same elbow fitting. Didn't find anything conclusive. To prep the existing tubing for new DW, I used a tubing cutter to take off an inch of the existing tubing under the counter in the kitchen, slid a new nut and ferrule onto the tubing, reamed the opening, flushed the tubing for shavings. During the install, I didn't use any pipe dope or teflon tape as is suggested elsewhere, and, as Al, my boss back in the mid seventies, taught me, tightened the nut only 'part way'.

Going back to earlier today, after disassembly-inspection-reassembly, I ran the Customer Service Program while the 2011 DW was still outside hooked up to a cold water garden hose. Yesterday the CSP ran without errors. Today I got error E08, (temperature or fill level) after phase 17. I ran it again and got the same error code. I think the error was due to day being colder than yesterday, and CSP timed out trying to heat the incoming cold water. Once installed inside the 2011 DW ran through the CSP without error. Also during this last CSP, I opened the door after phase 21, and the water temp was within a few degrees of the tech-sheet spec of 149F (meat thermometer stuck down into the strainer basket).

Over all, it turned out really well for the gamble of buying (on the cheap) a used machine in unknown condition. I don't know what the future would have held had I not found the two glass shards. I'm pretty confident in the gutting and inspection, which was worth it just to familiarize myself with the machine. It was a pleasure to work on, too.
 
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