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Whirlpool WEE510S0FS2 electric range not working clock flashes 12:00 board clicks no error codes

Billlove

Premium Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2022
Messages
15
Location
Northern IL
Possibly its Ghost Voltage(aka floating neutral).

Did you read page 32 of that service manual @bigbuck posted in post #8 and check the voltages first?

Page 32 is mainly how to check for ghost voltage(aka floating neutral) no matter what control board you have.:)

Jake
But if I get nothing from the board when I press start on the touchpad will it tell me anything? I cannot turn anything on.
I already know I am getting 120 from red to white and a fluctuation from white to black, when the board clicks.
I guess I am confused as to how this applies.
Like I said I am not an electrician. Can you explain further?
Thanks
 

Billlove

Premium Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2022
Messages
15
Location
Northern IL
I was thinking there should not be ghost or floating neutral, I looked at everything and had power BUT...
I have gotten so used to saying " I am not an electrician" I say it without even thinking about it.

The guy that installed the outlet is one of the best carpenters I ever met. He is a great all around handyman that does the minor electrical and plumbing work for the remodeling company that rebuilt my kitchen after the flood and final settlement from state farm. The only electrical work that we did was add the outlet for the stove because the dishwasher that was there was hard wired 120 and the cooktop that was there in 1975 when the house was built was also hard wired 240. Because it was one outlet and the remodeler had his best guy put in hundreds of outlets before he just had him do it to save a few bucks since the insurance company screwed me.

So I got to thinking...Ken is not an electrician either. I decided to take a deeper look into the outlet installation.
Of course, they drywalled over the electrical box and I rigged up a cover for it when we did the job so I had to double the size of the hole in the wall to see anything after taking my cover off. Just like before at first glance it all looked ok but I wanted to take a much closer look this time.
After removing the screws holding the outlet to the box I saw one of them was discolored. Looking closer I saw it was the screw closest to the black wire and about 3 times longer than it needed to be. I screwed it back in and sure enough it made contact with the black wire. I took off the neutral and red wires and the outlet dropped off. Over time the insulation that was partly compromised by the screw got warm enough to allow contact and this of course grounded the hot and created some arcing which in turn burned off more insulation which caused more arcing which burned the wire. So even though there was good enough contact to sustain 240 under no load and 120 on that side under no load when the board tried to turn the unit on I got a voltage drop and the lockout relay tripped to prevent the unit from functioning.
Unfortunately the unnecessary testing and probing that APP told me to do has shorted my original board because when I plugged it in I got the F6E4 code over and over. Although I may pull the board from my touchpad and switch them out to see if it is the pad or board, since I have a 1 year warranty from APP. I also may leave well enough alone since when I installed their new board the range started working like it should.

I still have work to do because as you will see I only did a temporary hook up with the new outlet since I destroyed the box and the black wire has the insulation burned off up into the conduit. I am hoping to just be able to move the outlet up on the wall 8 inches so I don't have to try to pull wire. Drywall repair is much easier and I have some to do whether I move the box or not.

Proves if you talk to enough people and ask enough questions a light goes on somewhere and somebody knows something.

On the downside, I had to buy a new board do a lot of unnecessary work and had a lot of stress. I blame State Farm, if they had just given me within 10% of what the repair quote from the flood was none of this would have happened. Ken, the carpenter that thinks he knows everything has to shoulder some of the blame too but neither of those are going to cover the extra $400 to $500 this cost me before it is all said and done. Pics show what I saw what I discovered and where I am at now, but at least I have answers!!!
 

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Jake

Appliance Tech - Admin
Staff member
Joined
Aug 24, 2004
Messages
132,461
Location
Redmond, Oregon
Like I said I am not an electrician. Can you explain further?
That makes too of us, you'd need a licensed and very well trained electrician to explain that in deep detail.:)

I was thinking there should not be ghost or floating neutral, I looked at everything and had power BUT...
I have gotten so used to saying " I am not an electrician" I say it without even thinking about it.

The guy that installed the outlet is one of the best carpenters I ever met. He is a great all around handyman that does the minor electrical and plumbing work for the remodeling company that rebuilt my kitchen after the flood and final settlement from state farm. The only electrical work that we did was add the outlet for the stove because the dishwasher that was there was hard wired 120 and the cooktop that was there in 1975 when the house was built was also hard wired 240. Because it was one outlet and the remodeler had his best guy put in hundreds of outlets before he just had him do it to save a few bucks since the insurance company screwed me.

So I got to thinking...Ken is not an electrician either. I decided to take a deeper look into the outlet installation.
Of course, they drywalled over the electrical box and I rigged up a cover for it when we did the job so I had to double the size of the hole in the wall to see anything after taking my cover off. Just like before at first glance it all looked ok but I wanted to take a much closer look this time.
After removing the screws holding the outlet to the box I saw one of them was discolored. Looking closer I saw it was the screw closest to the black wire and about 3 times longer than it needed to be. I screwed it back in and sure enough it made contact with the black wire. I took off the neutral and red wires and the outlet dropped off. Over time the insulation that was partly compromised by the screw got warm enough to allow contact and this of course grounded the hot and created some arcing which in turn burned off more insulation which caused more arcing which burned the wire. So even though there was good enough contact to sustain 240 under no load and 120 on that side under no load when the board tried to turn the unit on I got a voltage drop and the lockout relay tripped to prevent the unit from functioning.
Unfortunately the unnecessary testing and probing that APP told me to do has shorted my original board because when I plugged it in I got the F6E4 code over and over. Although I may pull the board from my touchpad and switch them out to see if it is the pad or board, since I have a 1 year warranty from APP. I also may leave well enough alone since when I installed their new board the range started working like it should.

I still have work to do because as you will see I only did a temporary hook up with the new outlet since I destroyed the box and the black wire has the insulation burned off up into the conduit. I am hoping to just be able to move the outlet up on the wall 8 inches so I don't have to try to pull wire. Drywall repair is much easier and I have some to do whether I move the box or not.

Proves if you talk to enough people and ask enough questions a light goes on somewhere and somebody knows something.

On the downside, I had to buy a new board do a lot of unnecessary work and had a lot of stress. I blame State Farm, if they had just given me within 10% of what the repair quote from the flood was none of this would have happened. Ken, the carpenter that thinks he knows everything has to shoulder some of the blame too but neither of those are going to cover the extra $400 to $500 this cost me before it is all said and done. Pics show what I saw what I discovered and where I am at now, but at least I have answers!!!

Excellent, good find.(y)

Jake
 

Billlove

Premium Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2022
Messages
15
Location
Northern IL
Your answering questions and making suggestions pointed me in the right direction, so you helped a lot Jake.
If the breaker had popped like I would have thought it should with the wire arcing at the plug it would have been easy to figure out.
I will let you know when I get it all put back together and it is working properly so you can mark it as fixed
Thanks again.
Bill
 

Jake

Appliance Tech - Admin
Staff member
Joined
Aug 24, 2004
Messages
132,461
Location
Redmond, Oregon
Ok Bill, sounds good.:)

Jake
 
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