WPRB8050D1WW GE washer, worn agitator spindle bushing/seal

Here

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Model Number
WPRB8050D1WW
Brand
GE
Age
More than 10 years
10 year old washer is operating fine except for the main tub seal which is known to be leaking. The tub nut was frozen. I didn't have 1-11/16th spanner/socket, so I cut it off by drilling. New nut is cheaper than a deep impact socket anyway. Then spent an hour digging out the crud between the inner basket and the drive shaft.

The seal/bushing around the agitator shaft appears badly worn too.

EdXMaf4.jpg

Not sure if it too is leaking onto the floor. Is the seal designed to keep the agitator shaft centered in the drive tube, or for keeping out water, or both? Does it matter if wash water gets past that seal?

The transmission is WH38X10002.

31qj9FP9yIL._SX425_.jpg

Can't find any part number online anywhere for the agitator shaft seal.

00028735.p04_2325.jpg

I suppose I could fit a sealed ball bearing bushing in its place.

I'm wondering if the bushing screws into the inside of the squarish drive tube. Maybe the pairs of divots are for a special spanner.

Any advice?
 
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Here

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New thought. It looks like the agitator spindle is 5/8" diameter. Maybe get some thin-wall brass tube 5/8" ID at a hobby shop and slip it over the spindle. Or some thin wall polyethelene or teflon ...
 

Jake

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Hi,

Can't find any part number online anywhere for the agitator shaft seal.
That's because they are not available separately.

You have to order the transmission and it comes with it, it also comes with a new tub seal.

Here's the transmission assembly for your model you can order(Video Included):
Manufacturer part number WH38X10002



Not sure if it too is leaking onto the floor. Is the seal designed to keep the agitator shaft centered in the drive tube, or for keeping out water, or both? Does it matter if wash water gets past that seal?
Both, I never seen water get past that seal, when it leaks its always the main tub seal that's bad.

Jake
 

Here

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Thanks Jake. At this point, never having needed repairs before this, the 10 year old washer has cost us about a dollar a week to own, something like $0.50 to $1.00 per wash ... assuming we paid $500 for it back then (don't remember the amount).

At $200+, a new transmission is too expensive for such an old washer, we'd just get a new washer, probably a front-loader. We wash king and queen size comforters 30-50 times per year (used as dog beds). The size is really too much for this top loader.

So if I can't find a $10 source for the agitator seal, I'll hack it with a nylon sleeve around the agitator spindle, and we'll keep using the washer until it dies. As far as I can make out, the relative motion between the drive tube and agitator spindle is a slow rotation of 10 degrees one way, then 10 degrees back, so it doesn't seem critical to keep the agitator spindle centered in the drive tube, so a sleeve of anything smooth ought to re-establish a good working seal. MSC or Grainger might even carry something that would work.

What do you think about the sleeve idea?
 

Jake

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What do you think about the sleeve idea?
Like I mentioned, I've never replaced that sleeve bearing before since its not available, as techs we are only allowed to replace parts that are available through the manufacturer.

Jake
 

Here

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Last edited:

Jake

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Sounds good, you seem very knowledgeable with bearings/seals/shafts, like you work in a bearing shop?:)

Jake
 

Jake

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Then I hope going this route works for you, I would guide you through it if I'd had done it before, but I haven't. I've replaced many of these GE transmissions when I worked at WARDS and SEARS as a tech.

Jake
 

Here

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Thanks Jake. Not sure how much work I ought to put into the washer, mainly because the drive tube has relatively deep grooves right where the tub seal wraps around it. So the new tub seal may not seal at all, or if it does, it may not last long.

p1090201.jpg.1.jpg



Oddly, the drive tube is smooth on one side (left in this photo) and grooved on the other side (right).
p1090194.jpg.1.jpg


I can't quite imagine how it could end up grooved on one side and smooth on the other except for uneven metal properties, a manufacturing defect. I wonder if there have been any recalls for this issue?

I'll try to take better photos if/when I need to replace the tub seal again.
 

Jake

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It just wore, all parts wear out over time, and this washer is over 10 years old. The average life of washers is only 8-12 years now, the good ol days of 20-30 years is long gone unfortunately.

That's why I suggest replacing the entire transmission or buy a new washer.:)

Jake
 

Here

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We'll see how it goes. If/when I need to replace the tub seal again, I'll buy some large heat shrink tubing to put over the wear grooves. But I'll also keep an eye out for a junk GE washer whose controls have failed, and pull the transmission from that. The hard work is done: tub nut off, and tub hub freed from drive tube.

Is there a way to obtain a list of washers models that were designed with WH38X10002 transmissions?

The tub nut is in. Heading to town now to pick it up.
 

Here

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Thanks all ! Yeah ! No leaks on a the short rinse/drain cycle with small load setting. More later.
 

Stuntman

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Hey, saw this post while battling a very similar issue with a WDSR2080DBWW washing machine. Tub was seemingly leaking around shaft, replaced seal, leak got way worse. Inspected the shaft to find almost identical wear to what Here pictured (including the wear being only on one side of the shaft).

I found a solution:

I took the new seal back out, and noticed two things:

First, the act of putting on the seal had made the spring tensioner get popped off, perhaps while installed, or maybe during removtal. I will mention this later but don't believe this was the root of the problem.

Second, the sealing lips on the new seal were at exactly the same points where the old sealing lips were riding (the damaged grooves).

My solution: I went to the bottom side of the seal (where it stops on the ribs of the outer tub) and took a razor blade, and removed approximately 1/16" thickness of rubber. (this was the amount of rubber I could remove with the razor until running into the metal frame of the seal). This allows the seal to sit around 1/16" deeper into the outer tub. Also, this now means that the sealing lips will be contacting new sections of the shaft that are not damaged from prior use.

When I reinstalled the seal, I put dish soap on the outer part of the seal AND the inner part (this was to avoid the seal tensioner problems I had before), and was sure to gently twist the seal onto the shaft, then into the tub. Realize, again, that due to the removed seal material, the seal will sit deeper in the tub, so press down firmly to make sure it sits as deep as possible.

I did this last night and have done two loads of laundry (super size loads) with no leaks. Hope it buys a few more years out of this old machine. Thought I would mention in case it helps someone else out.
 

Stuntman

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I should add, my solution for above was for the problem Here noted with the tub seal, NOT the inner to outer shaft seal of the transmission. My symptoms were a leaking tub, which is generally attributed to the tub seal. My new tub seal would not seal on the outer transmission shaft due to the scoring, which looked remarkably similar to the pictures Here posted in message #12.
 

pogoattaq

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Days late, and a dollar short. I had been able to find an oil seal for the agitator shaft. It is a dichtomatik, TCM Part 0610TC-BX. I had gotten one from MSC Industrial Direct in 2016, MSC Part #: 36676369.

It appears to have worked for the past 3 years. I dug back into the washer machine to replace the the lower bearing in the transmission again. The tub seal leaked both times washing out the bearing's grease, and chewing it to pieces. I had installed the new tub seal the first time with Indian Head Gasket Sealant, but it leaked. This go around I have tried silicone caulk between the tub seal and the tub, which seems to be a better choice.

My problem now is the brake doesn't seem to be working on this last reassembly; the washtub is spinning during agitation. At least the disassembly process is fresh in my head so it will go quicker!
 

Jake

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